Granite worktops: any advice please?

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Andrew Gabriel wrote:

Slate is not formed in volcanoes. I am not sure its even metamorphic.
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writes:

Slate is the metamorphic form of Shale (which is itself sedimentary). It is formed more from pressure (burial depth approx 10km) than temperature (formation temp approx 200C)
Cheers Clive
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PoP wrote:

Not half as badly as being in th eoriginal volcano it comes from..

You make up an exact template, and someone else with the kit cuts it to size. Your monumental mason.

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Mike Hibbert wrote:

I looked at that and it was more expensive than granite...

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Half the price of other quotes. They did the template,and supply and fit. Essential in my view.
What no-one else has meantioned here, but you should NOT overlook, is that Granite is HEAVY. Your Kitchen units must be well constructed. Good carcas, and potentialy supporting braces.
Granite woortops tend to be half the depth of Laminate tops. To make them look the same depth a nose is glued on at the front. Ask them for options how this nose is cut. It does not have to be square, nor rounded. In my case i went for ~~~~~~~~\ | | / Front Edge ~~|~~~~~ \ | | | | |______/
With the join hidden in the nib in bit.
To help support the worktop, and to provide a tempoary top whilst it was being cut etc the units were topped with half inch hardboard coming right up to the edge of the units. The granite being cut and designed to overlap by about 50 mm and the hardboard thus being hidden by the nose.
The unit drawers and doors should be hung such that they do not hit the granite when fitted. A couple of mine had to be lowered 1-2 mm when the granite was put in place because they just caught it.
Also if you have a big kitchen, expect to wait more than a couple of weeks between template and fit.
Finally, when they come to create the template, agree with them where the joins are going to be. There are always joins, granite joins are less visable but still irritating if in the wrong place.
Richard
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wrote:

Have a read of "Concrete Countertops" <(Amazon.com product link shortened)> Highly recommended for anyone considering a major kitchen worktop project. Concrete is an interesting option and some of the techniques apply equally to any extra-heavy worktop material.
-- Die Gotterspammerung - Junkmail of the Gods
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Try these guys..
http://www.naturalstoneproducts.co.uk /
I had them make a Fireplace hearth for me a while back and were very good and I'll be using them for my kitchen in January. They supply loads of types of granite and are willing to travel pretty much anywhere. They're based nr Leeds but will come down, do the template, go away and do the work then fit the tops for you when completed (about 2 weeks in general).
mention my name if you speak to them as I'm looking to contact them soon also !
thanks, Antony Cook.
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This might help.
When we decided to take the granite route a few years ago, we had a good look at the stuff and decided that 20mm was too thin, 30mm was just about acceptable and 40mm was the biz..
Trouble is of course that 40mm and 30mm are not only very heavy, they're also very expensive.
So this is what we did...
We had the guy who sold us the granite make up matching strips of 20mm thick x the length of the unit x 100mm wide. In our case this meant that we had about five lengths of 1200 x 100 x 20mm. (We also did this for an island unit too - big kitchen!)
We then used 20mm granite (big saving in and weight) and we had the supplier take the arris of the top and bottom show edges, likewise on the strips we had made. This is remarkably easy to do and only takes a minute with a grinder. We then glued the strip to the show edge of the worktop piece and voila, from the front it looks like a 40mm worktop with a rather nice birdsmouth in it. It knocks spots off 30mm!!
When it comes to fitting it, you just lay a 20mm piece of mdf on top of the unit to take the weight of the granite, making it smaller by the width of the strip and sit it on top. Be sparing with the 'good as nails' and make sure your truss is handy :)) It's really simple, effective and it'll save you just less than 1/3 of the price of 30mm granite.
If this isn't very cohesive, email me and I'll take a photo of ours for you and show you what I mean.
HTH
Patrick
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Patrick
Sorry to hi-jack this bit of the thread. Last year you wrote a useful (and amusing) entry on Damp. Two things.
One you mentioned a good book on damp (what a compelling read!) by the MD of Protim. I have been to their (Ireland) Web site and can find "Tony Lynch" as MD, but they are not flogging a book. Any more info you can provide that will help me track down this book?
Two you described a method of creating a vapour barrier at the base of a plaster wall. This involved bitumen but I didn't quite understand the details. COuld you redescribe the process for putting on such a barrier or should it be immediately obvious form your post on damp ?
BTW I am doing everything I can to improve air circulation and remove damp air at source in my flat to stop the "damp input" side of things
Thanks
CLive
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