Granite worktops: any advice please?

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price. We are still waiting for the bill (after 6 months)and the figure may have been nearer 750 or so. I do recall that the granite was 500 more than the ordinary laminate worktop. Still good value and was chamfered and cut on the draining area beside the sink.
Rgds
Noel
noel dot hegan at virgin dot net
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So... what is the name? How competitive?
Colin
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Have you thought about using Corian?
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On Tue, 18 Nov 2003 20:43:34 GMT, "Mike Hibbert"

Why would anybody want a kitchen that looks like McDonalds?
.andy
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Andy Hall wrote:

Cos they like McDonalds?

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wrote:

Because when they get home after a hard days work they want to pop in the kitchen and order a ready meal on demand from SWMBO?
PoP
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Never heard of that material. I'll have a search. thanks, JB
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wrote:

I wouldn't bother. It is not a substitute for the real thing and is widely used in fast food places.
.andy
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I don't think it would go down too well with 'the boss' either! If one of her mates mentioned "that's lovely, that's just like the Burger King worktop" she would *totally* freak. cheers, JB
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wrote:

Quite.
Another few tips.
For the granite, you will also find that the price is affected by the blend of colours. We found one which is predominantly black but with crystalline silver-grey and quite subtle but rich blue under certain lights.
Try to borrow pieces of your chosen type and put them in the room for a bit, together with a cupboard door to get an idea of the final effect.
For the floor, it is worth buying a few pieces of slate of different types - two of each should be enough. It is worth looking at different sizes as well, but do try them in the room. We wanted something that would work for the kitchen and adjoining conservatory and settled on 600x400mm. This allows you to have fairly wide grouting which looks better with the uneven slate but without being massive.
We also played around with different floor finishes. I don't like highly glossed floors because they look like plastic. On the other hand, a matt or satin finich can look quite dull. Eventually we settled on products by Lithofin which are excellent, albeit a little expensive. However you don't much at all so it is likely to be something like one 30 container. We found that two coats of a silicone sealer (which dries just above matt) and a colour enhancer produced rich colours without making the final result look artificial.
.andy
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wrote:

Not having had experience of granite worktops a couple of questions are in order......
Presumably, being granite, the surface could be a bit cold during the winter months. How does granite stand up to having a hot pan stood on it?
And I would guess that you buy the granite worktops for a specific size. Can't quite see my router trimming one down...... ;)
PoP
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Granite needs serious equipment to make the cutouts and chamfers etc. You pretty much have to get the supplier to do this, which is very expensive. A long straight slab of granite is much less than a complicated one with a Belfast cutout and integral drainer.
Christian.
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crockery on her granite worktop, especially glass. It's very unforgiving if you drop anything on it.
--
Chris Green ( snipped-for-privacy@x-1.net)

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Plus not forgetting that some types of granite worktop are quite radioactive. A friend of mine suffered severe headaches after having granite worktops fitted to her new kitchen, and had to have them replaced with granite-look post formed tops after being hospitalised.
Mal
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Dildron Maldin wrote:

Shame that radioactivity of all the things it does do, doesn't give you headaches.

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On 19 Nov 2003 10:08:42 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@isbd.co.uk wrote:

I'm not sure. I can't say that we have broken more things on a granite worktop than the laminated one that preceded it. Neither surface will flex if you drop a glass on it.
.andy
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wrote:

In reality it acquires the temperature of the surroundings. It does feel slightly cool to the touch because of being a better conductor than wood and for food preparation works well.

There's no real problem, although not something we often do.

That would be a challenge......

.andy
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Not sure how granite compares with thick slate, but my father made their dining table ~25 years ago, and had the slate top custom made from large sheets of polished slate from the slate mine at the top of Honister Pass in the Lake District. He liked the thought of it being completely heat proof (came out of a volcano, and plates and dishes don't get that hot;-) so no need for table cloths or place mats. However, the first time a hot plate was put on it, the plate cracked in half, and we had a couple more such incidents before having to return to place mats. The slate top has survived perfectly over the years without any damage appearing on it, in spite of constant use.
--
Andrew Gabriel

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snipped-for-privacy@cucumber.demon.co.uk (Andrew Gabriel) wrote in message

Completely off-topic I know but isn't slate metaporhic, created by heat and pressure on shale as opposed to ignious, from a volcano.
IANA-geologist.
Andrew
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    andrew_d snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com (Andrew May) writes:

Probably obvious, but neither am I ;-)
--
Andrew Gabriel

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