gloss paint in bathrooms

All, I am about to decorate the flat, and have a simple question about gloss paint. I know that 'normal' mat wall/ceiling paint must be a specific bathroom type in order to cope well with condensation, splashing. However, what about gloss ?? I am thinking of using the same gloss throughout for the woodwork, probably dulux, and dont want to have to buy seperate 'types' for the bathroom (expense, colour variation, hassle etc).
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
NC wrote in message ...

the
Ordinary gloss is fine.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
cheers.

However,
for
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
NC wrote:

IMO "kitchen and bathroom paint" is a huge con and waste of time and money. Ordinary good quality emulsion is perfectly OK - if you *need* an anti-condensation paint (rare), then buy a proper one.

Oil-based gloss is absolutely fine. Prepare the surfaces properly before painting, this is a must. I wouldn't use water-based paint in the bathroom (or anywhere else, for that matter, on my property).
________________________________________________________________ Sent via the PAXemail system at paxemail.com
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The Kitchen and Bathroom 'type' branded retail products use little more than standard vinyl emulsion formulation. So you can avoid them and save yourself some money.
For commercial projects such as laundries, kitchens you'll tend to find Acrylic Eggshell and Solvent-borne Eggshell used, as these do offer some benefits in environments with alot of moisture. For problem areas similar products may be specified, but these may be formulated with an added biocide to prevent spores germinating on the paint coating film and thus preventing mould/mildew growth.

For internal areas any good quality gloss which takes you fancy should be fine. I'd still tend to stick with a solvent-borne type as these dry to a harder film than the water-borne types currently available, this is a useful quality for resisting abrasion and mechanical knocks and bangs.
Regards
--
Max Bone Decorating Direct Ltd
http://www.decoratingdirect.co.uk /
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.