Garage Lighting

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Whilst it is true that the light from a fluorescent is not constant, it does not turn on and off as some suggest, but merely slightly changes brightness at a 100Hz rate due to the persistence in the tube phosphor integrating the electron bombardment over time --- as it were!. I have a pillar drill, a myford 7 and a woodworking lathe and can't honestly say its ever been a problem. At certain revs you can perceive a slight moving pattern on the chucks, but nothing more than that.
Dave
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On Sun, 07 Sep 2003 19:50:23 +0100, PoP

They can do. This is another reason to use electronic ballasts which run the tube in the tens of kHz.

.andy
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On Sun, 07 Sep 2003 15:17:02 +0100, PoP

I've used double 55W fluorescent fittings (quantity 6) at ceiling height (2.5m) and two further at 2.1m height in the space below where the doors open. I have timber storage racks above the garage doors and these extra two fittings go below these. Each fitting has a reflector and all have electronic ballasts because I am sensitive to fluorescent light flicker from 50Hz mains. I replaced the tubes that came with the fittings with daylight types.
I also have the walls boarded with plywood and have painted these and the (boarded) ceiling with white emulsion.
For most activities I switch on about half of the lights, but for certain operations needing more light, I can turn all of them on.
.andy
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Hi.
Just one more tip with fluorescents: if the ceiling is painted white, I'd suggest putting the fls on their side on say a 10" shelf a bit above eye level, so you dont see the bulb directly. The light is diffused over the ceiling, so much better than bare tubes.
Or if youve got much racking /shelving in there, they can just sit on top out of view.
Regards, NT
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On Mon, 08 Sep 2003 06:56:33 +0100, PoP

The roof is pitched with tiles (this is a detached building) and has trussed roof frames. I boarded onto the top side of the "ceiling" joists - if you imagine it like a house, the underside would have had plasterboard. This boarding is T&G floorboarding, of which I was able to obtain a good price for quantity at a timber yard. So from below you can see the joists and the underside of the boards.
The roof is insulated with Celotex between the rafters, with air gap behind, soffit vents etc. - the floor boarded area is not. The effect of this is that the boarding reduces the effect of heat rising all the way up into the top part of the roof but still allows some passage of warmth through the boards to keep the roof area slightly warmed.
I use the roof area for storage - things don't rust or otherwise deteriorate. I put in a loft hatch with integrated fold down ladder for daily access, and then a much larger removable panel behind it with a hoist above for lifting up larger or more awkward items like bicycles.
I framed in front of the (single brick) walls with pressure treated 75x50 timber, screwed to the joists at the top and the floor at the bottom and with a 25mm air gap behind. I fitted Celotex between the framing, and then plywood onto that. The plywood was quite a good quality external 18mm WBP from Finland, sourced from Jewsons. One side tended to be better than the other and small defects were easy to sand and fill.
The trick seems to be to buy all the materials at once and contact a few places for pricing. Once the order is of a reasonable size and they realise that they are in competition, the prices drop quite markedly.
.andy
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wrote:

Thanks for that. I imagined you'd boarded from below (as well).
PoP
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PoP wrote:

I used 4 x 5' 65W tubes in my 12' x 8' workshop. With magnolia walls and ceiling you get a very good working light.
Also make sure you buy the diffusers for the strip lights - they have saved a tube numerous times when I have accidentally clomped one with a bit of wood!
--
Cheers,

John.

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On Mon, 08 Sep 2003 02:02:08 +0100, John Rumm

I'm glad I'm not the only one ;)
PoP
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As my garage is unheated, I used IP65 sealed units, which not only protect the tubes from accidental damage, but also, if you make sure the entries are sealed and close them in warm, dry conditions, from condensation in winter. As the tubes lose light output with age, it is a good idea in a workshop to replace them every 2 or 3 years, depending on the use they get. Cleaning the diffusers regularly also makes a lot of difference.
Colin Bignell
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I was going to say it seems an expensive solution to a problem that shouldn't exist in a garage, but looking at TLC prices, you get a Telco twin 6ft IP65 for 47.50 quid against about 35 for a 'normal' fitting with reflector. Prices plus VAT, of course.
--
*Never underestimate the power of stupid people in large groups.

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@argonet.co.uk London SW 12
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my surname here>.uk.com> wrote:

Until I glued a rubber speed bump across the door, my garage would flood every time there was heavy rain. As the raft has sunk in the corner furthest from the door, it could be a couple of inches deep there. Even now, a rain-laden North wind can bring water seeping through the single skin brick wall after a few hours. Painting it with Aquaseal has been on my to-do list for a few years now.

I don't think I paid as much as that, but I don't have the invoice to hand. One of my factory units has a low-roofed mezzanine floor and I used sealed units there to protect the lights from damage. When I bought those, I added a couple of units on for my garage, so was able to buy them with both trade and quantity discounts.
Colin Bignell
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On Mon, 08 Sep 2003 10:41:04 +0100, Dave Plowman

I was in Focus DIY shed earlier today and swung by the lighting section.
4ft x 38w with diffuser costs 25, VAT included. May not be IP65 spec but it looks like I'll be grabbing 4 of those shortly.
BTW, I thought metrication had taken over big time these days? Why are flourescent lights described in feet then?
PoP
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On Tue, 9 Sep 2003 19:44:32 UTC, PoP

Especially when flour is measured in kilograms...! :-)
--
Bob Eager
rde at tavi.co.uk
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Describe 'em how you want: call the 5ft length 150cm if you're being usefully descriptive, or 2.54 * 60 = 152.4 if you're being inappropriately exact (like those recipes which tell you to take '56g of butter' when it meant 'about 2 oz'. But, unusually, I digress ;-). Not even the Society for Mass Metrication is going to suggest changing the physical dimensions of existing flourescent tube fittings, meaning people having to keep twice as many tubes in stock and fitting too-loose/too-tight or otherwise marginally incompatible tubes into fittings made 20 and more years ago!
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     snipped-for-privacy@hp.com writes:

It really doesn't matter much, since there's no dimension on a 5' tube which measures 5' anyway. The bi-pin tube size measurement for the original tubes was the spacing between fittings when you ran them in a continuous line. However, that doesn't apply to all tube sizes. A quick check of the datasheets shows 18" and 6' tubes must be based on some other scheme.
In practice, tubes are now quoted in mm sizes, but again, not their real size -- the conversion is simply to convert the old tube size to mm using conversion factor 300mm = 1', so a 5' tube is now called a 1500mm tube. Of course, there's no dimension on it which is 1500mm, and because 300mm is not really the same as 1', the quoted measurement is not even the fitting spacing anymore either ;-)
--
Andrew Gabriel

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On Wed, 10 Sep 2003 01:43:19 +0100, John Rumm

Agreed - I went to the TLC web site last night.
I was comparing the Focus price with the 40-50 quid someone quoted in an earlier message for IP65's. They must have been talking about something different :)
PoP
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As others have said, fluorescents are ideal for this use. New twin 6ft fittings with metal reflectors will cost about 40 quid each from the likes of TLC, so will be fairly pricey to do the job properly. It's worth looking for a factory or office block which is being demolished or re-furbished - these are usually scrapped at this time, and can be had for very little. Try and get more than you need for spares, although many designs have a very long production span so are easy to repair.
--
*Santa's helpers are subordinate clauses.*

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@argonet.co.uk London SW 12
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Simon Avery wrote:

I agree with the flouries, perhaps taking the layout into consideration you need to think about what task lighting you require. Having 8 6ft doubles in my painted walls 4m x 10m workshop here fed from 3 phases, the full splash proof type, we still have incandesant task lighting on all rotating machinery, the strobe effect is dangerous and is avoidable. If good colour rendition is important blue daylight simulation bulbs in task lights are invaluble.
Niel.
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In a single garage with white ceiling and bare brick walls, I have 3 x 5' 58W single fittings, and that's good enough for regular woodwork. Bought a 4-pack and the 4th went into the loft. It might not be good enough for very intricate work.
Have replaced the ballasts in the ones in the garage with instant start electronic as the freezer is in there, and nipping in for a few seconds to access the freezer could be anoying when the lights only finish coming on as you have finished in there. (Actually, only got round to replacing two of them so far -- last one's been waiting a couple of years for me to get around to it;-)
--
Andrew Gabriel

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Andrew Gabriel wrote:

Add an ordinary light or 2 for quick acces jobs like getting to the freezer, no point firing everything up when all you need is a little lighting.
--
James...
http://www.jameshart.co.uk /
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