Garage Conversion

We have a detached double garage which was built approximately 5-6 years ago.
I am considering converting half of it to house recording equipment for my son and was wondering what the implications of doing this are.
The garage wall is a single brick width with two separate up-and-over doors separated by a brick pier. The roof is made from trussed rafters and there is one (small) window to the side. There is power to the garage and the floor is concrete.
My thoughts are to divide the garage down the middle with stud partition wall, remove the up-and-over door and brick up the opening. This is where the entrance would be. Inside would be dry lined and possibly a wooden floor would be built over the existing concrete one.
Would this sort of conversion require planning or building regs. Are there any major gaffs in the way I am thinking? We don't actually put cars in the garage, it is currently housing all the usual clutter that inhabits most garages!
Any thoughts on this would be gratefully received.
Regards
Martin
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Martin Carroll

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If you're making anything like a habitable room, then it will need planning permission and have to meet fire safety and escape requirements. It will also need to meet ventilation and heat retention qualities for a habitable apartment.
If you're thinking of sound recording, then will it spill any noise pollution to the surrounding properties ? Will it need any special requirements on power supply to the sound equipment ?
Have a word with your local planning department or a friendly architect. They'll be able to explain all the needs to you.
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