Fixing Celotex to walls

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Hi there
Just about to start insulating my single-skin brick shed with Celotex and have got a couple of questions:
The Celotex will be fitted to the wall by fixing battens over the Celotex and then fixed to the wall. What is the best way to attach the battens to the wall? Should I use screws or masonry nails? If using screws, I need to put rawl plugs into the brick. What's the best and quickest way to do this? If I pre-drill all the holes in the brickwork, how can I be sure to line up the batten with the holes.
Any help would be greatly appreciated. Am a total newbie to this kind of thing.
Stephen
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I would glue it on.
MrCheerful
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Don't bother with nails. You'll probably end up just ejecting the brick from the wall, assuming the brick even survives.

SDS drill with suitable bit.

Predrill holes in all the battens first. Then put against the wall in their final positions. Using a old smaller bit, drill through one of your predrilled holes (above half way up the batten) into the brick to make a mark. Remove batten. Drill and plug hole. Attach batten to hole using screw. Use spirit level to make batten upright. Use old bit again to drill through each predrilled hole. Remove batten again. Drill and plug each hole. Reattach batten using screws. If you've got a steady hand or a helper, you can skip out the steps of attaching by one screw to make the other punch marks, but you risk misaligning the holes.
Christian.
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At what spacing should I drill the holes? Every 18 inches?

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I use brown plugs with 5mm screws going at least 50mm into the wall, avoiding mortar lines. Every 18 inches sounds fine. I usually put 5 or 6 in spread evenly, ensuring they are approximately in the middle of a brick/block, to avoid damage.
Christian.
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Thanks Mate!

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The bricks used to build this shed must be extra tough because I'm blunting drill bit after drill bit. They look like normal house bricks but the dust is grey (not the usual pinky colour). I didnt expect them to be so tough!
My mate says I should just drill into the pug joints. Is this OK?

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MrCheerful
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Whats an SDS drill?
I have a Bosch hammer drill at the moment.

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On Tue, 17 Feb 2004 23:55:40 -0000, "Stephen Gilkes"

[T] I'm not sure what it stands for but it's a 'system'.
A std 'hammer' drill works by having a searies of 'ramps' on one of the drive gears causing the bit to move backward and forward slightly as it goes round. They generally have a standard or hand chucks.
An SDS 'tool' (as they don't just drill) use a different method to create the percussion and the q/r chuck takes a range of 'bits' including chisels etc and could be thought of as similar to a tiny Kango? They can be used as a std rotary drill, drill with hammer or just the hammer action (bit not rotating) . The bits have flutes on them where they go into the chuck so they don't slip.
I think there are different std's (I'm new to all this myself) eg you can get SDS and SDS II etc?
They range in price from +AKM-29 to hundreds for something that will work all day (if you can lift one all day that is!).
Great for getting ceramic tiles of the wall I'm told?
All the best ..
T i m
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If you have a chuck that you tighten onto the drill, then you do not have an sds drill. SDS drills and bits are a godsend to any serious diy or building work, they have a special chuck that holds the drill bit with two sliding pieces on the sides, a hammer goes in and out to physically smash the floating drill bit into the wall. There is never a problem with retightening drill bits, there is only a few moments of actually drilling, the drills never get blunt or wear out (in practical terms)
Screwfix have a very nice offer on an erbaur sds drill at the moment:
86109 79.99 you will need the appropriate bits too.
You will never regret buying an sds drill, I am certain.
MrCheerful
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Thanks for all the info.
It seems that the bricks used to build the shed are (according to a friend) cheap bricks that are absolute nightmare to drill into. They're much more hard than usual housebricks. Hopefully an SDS drill will do the business.
So I cant just fix into the pug joints?

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wrote:

Unless for his first job he offers it up to a wall made of soft materials in order to drill a little hole for a rawlplug. Then two seconds later he's got a new doorway to walk through ;)
PoP
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Would this SDS drill be OK? - Its 93.98 from B&Q
Bosch PBH 240 RE Rotary Hammer and Chiselling Machine Power Input: 600W Chuck size: SDS 13mm (1/2") Keyless No Load Speed: 0-800rpm Drilling capacity: in concrete 22mm, in masonry 50mm with a core Electro pneumatic hammer produces a massive 2.2 Joule impact force For drilling in concrete & chiselling in masonry Up to 4600 powerful hammer blows per minute Bosch Electronic Speed Control: Variable speed pre-selection & smooth acceleration form 0 to max Forward & reverse action Carrying case, SDS chuck, SDS chisel & 1 x 5, 6 & 8mm SDS drill bits

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That would be fine.
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Definitely. However, if you aren't expecting to do much work with it, I have the (now) 29.99 NuTool. It isn't particularly known for reliability, but mine still works without any problems at all. It even comes with a load of cheap bits and chisels and has easily given me enough value to justify the price even if it explodes tomorrow.
BTW, when drilling rawlplug holes with it, I find it best to drill the first 0.5cm - 1cm without hammer.
Christian.
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I am loathe to spend any more money than I have to.
Do I really need to avoid fixing the battens to the mortar?

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It's up to you. I've never had much success with fixing to mortar. I would be cautious in attaching anything heavy to it. Perhaps a friend has an SDS drill you can borrow?
Christian.
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Hi Christian
I just went out and did test on the mortar. Its pretty sandy and crumbly so I'm going the SDS way.
Stephen

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I went ahead and bought the Bosch SDS drill. It was reduced to 49.99 in B&Q.
Absolutely brilliant. Goes through the brick really easily.
Thank you

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