Fire regs and halogen downlighters

There was an article in the Sunday Times about downlighters inserted into a ceiling breaking the fire protection between floors and that a back guard is required.
I've just had a good look at a typical B&Q 50W 50mm halogen downlighter and can't see where this break is. The bulb is presumably inert to fire and the surround is brass. The clip ensures a fairly airtight join.
What exactly is the problem ?
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which they're not. I don't think the bulb is particularly resistant to fire either IMO. ..
SJW A.C.S. Ltd.
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G&M wrote:

Oho. I had teh ruddy building onspector round and he sprung that one one me too. First I had heard of it.

As I understand it, its the hole in the plasterboard ceiling that is teh problem. Flames below lick through teh cracks and set light to the joists,...etc.
I'd welcome any info on this. I am faced with removing 25 of teh buggers now he's got this bee in his bonnet, and retrofittng guards...

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wrote:

You appear to need some of these:
http://tinyurl.com/34r6g
PoP
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These are for commercial premises to meet much stricter regs. I'm sure they are great but they wouldn't even fit in the 5.25" voids above my ceilings.
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Smaller versions are available (and a bit cheaper):
http://www.qvselectricalwholesale.co.uk/acatalog/QVS_Direct_INDOOR_LIGHTING_10.html
Look about halfway down the page.
PoP
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PoP wrote:

None of those will fit. I only have the depth of celing joist and the hole through which the units were fitted to work wih. The units have been installed over a year now and teh previous BCO never ever mentiobed this requirment. To fit what your URL show would require me to remove and replace ceilings in six rooms.

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wrote:

See my other response - the covers shown on the following web page might assist you:
http://www.qvselectricalwholesale.co.uk/acatalog/QVS_Direct_INDOOR_LIGHTING_10.html
These also appear to be cheaper.
PoP
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Well, I hadn't heard of this one, but looking at the relevant bit of the building regs, there is a requirement for 15 minutes for passage of flame and 30mins for collapse, between floors. You might get away with it if its the roof above, or perhaps a bathroom (using the "not an inhabited room" ploy). If you have used plastic lamp fittings, I think you are stuffed. If the fittings are in metal housings, then I reckon you could get away with silicone sealing the fitting to the surrounding plasterboard. The interesting one is what is the passage of flame time of a wood panelled ceiling, with floorboards above? The relevant BS used to be BS476, I don't know what it is now.
Regards Capitol
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http://www.dorset-technical-committee.org.uk/reports/report8.asp
Kev
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Kev wrote in message ...

Thanks.
Hmm. Very relevant. I know of one installation of about 10 large 240V units in a victorian house which is being rented!! I think I need to consider what to do about that one.
I have some difficulty in believing the 400 degrees figure quoted for low voltage lamps unless there is a fault in the fixture. At these temperatures, the life expectancy of the lamps would only be a few hours.
Regards Capitol
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Capitol wrote:

Ah.
The inspector was not worried about flame leaping into the loft, under the thatched roof. Only leaping intop the inter-floor space,

The fittings are all in corridoors, and bathrooms and a seldom used kitchen, but does that refer to the room below or tha room above?

They aleady are in most casessince the gibbons of electricians failed to install them neatly.

The more interesting one in my case is a ceiling composed only of oak beams. with plasterboard between, and the floor laid entirely on top of the beams.

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Provided the plasterboard is filling the gaps between the beams and close to the floor above, then this is deemed to meet the requirements AIUI. I was referring to having a bathroom above the light when I suggested the not an inhabitable room ploy. I'm not sure if there isn't a foam filler, which it might be possible to inject around the fittings to provide the flame seal being requested. It would have to retain it's shape under flame conditions. I guess it might be silicone. I have seen wood coatings which paint on to give, say 15 minutes, fire protection. Can anyone else think of something easy?
Regards Capitol
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The Natural Philosopher <> wrote

I'd seen the two types, shielded and not shielded. Unfortunately i'd already fitted the unshielded in a wooden ceiling.
The instructions specified minimum gaps above the light to allow for heat dissipation, which I complied with. But it doesn't instil confidence. In mitigation, this light is in a loo cubilcle, so it won't be on for long periods of time (hopefully !).
Looks like PoP's sheilds would do the trick in this case, but at 9 quid a throw, it's be cheaper to buy the shielded in the first place.
Cheers
Paul.
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I just can't see this. Given a piece of plasterboard or a thick piece of glass housed in brass, which do you thnk wil burn first ?
Somehow I think building control have got the wrong end of the stick here.
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