fencing

the local angels have kicked down my front wall wife wants a fence up(just across the front ,i have hedges to each side) don't like larch lap,was thinking of using flooring planks t&g and treating it,think it will look ok if i round the top with my jigsaw is this viable guys?
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Mindwipe wrote:

If you're going to do that, buy pressure treated timber - it'll last several times longer than non-treated.
--
Grunff


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Floor boards will contract and expand differentially and the resulting gaps will look rubbish.
dg

treating
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dg wrote:

How about a 100,000 volt electric fence - this might quickly convert your local 'angels' into real angels - if only it was legal :-)
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gaps
The answer to that is to chamfer the edges, so that the gaps look intentional.
As Grunff says, pressure treated timber will last far longer, but I would also suggest that, if you do use that, also use a nail that will last too. I made a couple of gates over 20 years ago with pressure treated timber and bronze ring barb nails, from my local yacht chandler. Apart from needing to replace some of the weather edge along the top, they have hardly needed any maintenance since I put them up.
Colin Bignell
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On Thu, 30 Oct 2003 08:19:30 -0000, "nightjar" <nightjar@<insert my surname here>.uk.com> wrote:

I have found galvanised nails very effective. I usually predrill for them to reduce the chance of splitting and also to ease the strain on the already planted posts
While I would definitely agree re pressure treated posts and for any part that will be in contact with the ground, we have some fencing where the intermediaries, which are well clear of ground level, are just softwood (re-claimed, I'm a tight b*****d), have survived 15 years so far with nothing more than a soaking of creosote annually, if I remember.
Paul Mc Cann
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Paul Mc Cann wrote:

Round here rough sawn pressure treated is extremely cheap - pennies more than non-treated. You put it up and for get about it for 25 years or so.
I reckon creosoting all our fences/gates/other outdoor timber would take the best part of a week. I'm really not prepared to spend one week per year doing that (that's 2% of the year!!).
--
Grunff


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I think I'd go for stainless steel screws, no hammering required at all and with a good cordless driver it doesn't take much more time.
--
Chris Green ( snipped-for-privacy@x-1.net)

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wrote:

snip
All wood will adjust to seasonal variations in humidity. Pick the right type of fencing (I don't mean fencing material but the method of construction)and it will cope with this problem
Paul Mc Cann
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Mindwipe wrote:

It's viable, but why can't you just use featheredge board?
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On Thu, 30 Oct 2003 13:14:45 GMT, "jerrybuilt"

Or scrap wood like mine. :-)
http://uk.photos.yahoo.com/marknicesenior
Mark S.
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Unless you're very careful and use a jig to make sure all the boards are identical, rounding off the tops is likely to look a right bodge IMO. The idea of shaping the tops of fencing boards and posts is to shed water and so protect the end grain from rot damage. It would look much nicer, be more effective and be a lot simpler to just cut the boards straight across and nail a preserved chamfered batten along the top edge.
Also, It's much easier and better looking to mark and cut the top edge of fence boards after they're fixed using a chalk line, especially if the top edge isn't level. You could even mark out and cut a curve, using a loose line.
I go along with jerrybuilt's suggestion to use feather-edge - much better than T&G with its grooves that hold moisture.
Peter
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