Exterior Wood filler

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Mark wrote:

before thatcher, yes ?
sammi
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sam ende snipped-for-privacy@sende.co.uk typed:

LOL yes, before E Heath even.
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IMM wrote:

Car body filler if painting afterwards.
Use brute frce and wire brushes to remove all punbky wood, then treatwith staivilisinf stuff - actually superglue, and =knooting both eem to bind soft fi¾rs together.
When that lot has set, slap on two part polyester resind mix =- P38 or chemical metal are the usual 'brands' - shape as good as you can with a poutty knofe, allow to half set (5 mins) then sand like firey as once set rockhard it takes forever to sand down.
That will outlast any wooden frame you have left by aboutt 100 years.
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???
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Hi,
Car filler is not necessarily a good idea, sometimes the 'filler' ingredient is talc which is quite porous. Also car filler isn't very flexible so may pull away from the wood as it shrinks when the weather gets drier.
For a temporary repair fill the cavity with expanding foam, sand the foam flat then tape over it with aluminium tape and paint over that. It's also worth treating the hole in the frame with wood preserver to minimise further rot.
For a more permenant repair first chisel the rotten wood away to good leaving a clean regular shaped hole. Then cut a piece of similar wood to fill the hole as neatly as possible but slightly proud to the surrounding frame, and treat the wood and the frame with preserver. When dry glue the wood fillet in with a good polyurethane adhesive/sealant such as Sikaflex 221, and when that has set sand the new wood flush to the frame.
Hope this helps, Pete.
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Pete C wrote:

I don't know what car filler you've been using, but it's *nothing* like anything I've ever used.
The resin is normally styrene, and the filler is almost always either polymer or aluminium. It's very flexible, and never shrinks.

Have you ever actually tried sanding foam??? I have...
--
Grunff

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I was thinking of more common body fillers like Isopon p38. Looking at the MHDS:
http://www.u-pol.com/countries/en/downloads/hsds/isoponbodyfillerrange.pdf
it reads:
"4. Mineral filler (which is a constituent of most body fillers), "in excessive quantities", is considered a moderate risk and, therefore, it is advisable to provide proper working methods/machinery to minimise the risk."
Sounds like talc to me, as a polymer or metal is not a mineral. Talc is an ideal constituent for filler as it's cheap and easy to sand. A polymer would react with the styrene, or melt and clog the sandpaper whilst sanding, and aluminium would be an absolute b*tch to sand down!!!

Sorry I meant the wood itself shrinks and expands due to changes in humidity throughout the seasons. Car body filler is only slightly flexible and has fairly poor adhesion to wood if it gets damp and/or moves due to humidity changes, so will separate from the wood over time. Car body filler is fine for interior use though.

No, what sort of foam was it and how did you sand it? I would have thought a belt or random orbital sander would do well enough. Cutting it with a sharp knife might be another alternative, it isn't the hardest material to shape.
cheers, Pete.
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Er, um, I think you'll find that metals are most definitely mineral, they certainly aren't animal or vegetable.
--
Chris Green

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Pete C wrote:

Pretty sure its mica powder actually.

No, it doesn't. The wood is sufficiently felxible to accomodate the filer.
Separartion only occurs if the filler is used to bond to already rotten wood that has not been stabilised.
IF you pur some realtively free running hard setting resin into teh soft punk, teh wood will stabilise and be far less prone to shrnkage anyay - you are in effect making something akin to MDF at this point :-)

It sands OK, but needs a latyer of filler on top really.

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wrote:

Why not email Isopon to get the definitive answer? I've got no idea why they might use mica when talc is cheaper.

Car body filler bonds very well to sound wood but then unbonds itself in time if the wood is subject to movement, humidity changes and damp. If you were building a yacht to sail around the world in, what would you bond it all together with? Isopon? :)

Why not just chisel the rotton wood out and replace with new wood? Much better and more professional than faffing around with resin, car body filler and nails to stop the filler falling out :)))

True but I would put the time towards doing a lasting repair instead.
BTW I love reading this NG, people talk about their £100 routers, £1000 combis, and... repairing sash window frames with car body filler :)))
cheers all, Pete.
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If you read back it is a temporary solution for 6 months or so.
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I knooow, but there's nowt so permanent as temporary.
cheers, Pete.
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I use it as a general purpose filler on wood before painting - it's much better than any of the 'proper' ones. And it also dries near instantly.
--
*Money isn't everything, but it sure keeps the kids in touch.

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@argonet.co.uk London SW 12
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Certainly on the couple of car bodywork repair manuals I've got they caution that this sort of filler can be porous - and say to use the metal loaded type if possible. It's quite a bit more expensive, though.
--
*Why is the third hand on the watch called a second hand?

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@argonet.co.uk London SW 12
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On Fri, 20 Feb 2004 01:23:55 +0000 (GMT), Dave Plowman

Another way is to make a filler from epoxy resin thickened with microballoons and fumed silica, far better than the cheap stuff and not that expensive too.
cheers, Pete.
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Grunff wrote in message ...

shrink around it sometimes, usually because it has dried out for the first time. IME this is a one off thing and filling the gap usually does the trick permanently. Talc and chalk are not good as sole aggregates because they are absorbent and tend to over thicken. There are all kinds of alternatives to get the right balance of properties.
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Cuprinol wood hardener?
Michael Chare
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Is that what all that says?
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Michael Chare wrote in message ...

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Whatever you do, don't sniff the glue - it plays havoc with your keyboard skills :o)

Mind you "sand like firey" has a certain ring of truth about it!
--
Bob Mannix
(anti-spam is as easy as 1-2-3 - not)
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