Evaporative Air Coolers

The reason I'm considering one at all is that we have a need to cool a number of rooms - particularly during this hot spell - but at different times of the day. An air cooler would operate in the office during the afternoon, a child's bedroom in the early evening and the parents' bedroom later in the evening. All of them can get incredibly hot. In the latter two cases the cooling could take place prior to the room being occupied, which fans wouldn't really do, then be switched off, eliminating the noise.
In an office environment, I'm a little worried about the idea of chucking a couple of litres of water per hour into the air near some computing equipment....do they actually cause dampness around the place, or does the existing hot air take care of that?
(I'm looking for a solution today rather than next year, so there won't be any planting of greenery outside the windows, installing an aircon system or anything like that)
C heers
Brian
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
bigbrian wrote:

They don't work.
While they are quite capable of dropping the air temperature by 2-4C, in doing so they raise the relative humidity to close on 100%. This makes the room feel much hotter - high relative humidity is extremely uncomfortable, because your perspiration simply doesn't evaporate.
Look at ways of reducing the total heat input into the room. Presumably most of it is via light through south facing windows? If that's the case, then you need some highly reflective blinds (silvery-white). These will bounce a significant proportion of the visible spectrum back out. It's by no means a complete solution, but it will make a big difference.
--
Grunff


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Good point. (actually the one I looked at this morning advertsed a reduction of 6 degrees C, which is very noticeable but I personally hate humidity.
Brian
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

It depends where you live! They work(ed) very well indeed for us when we lived in Riyadh in Saudi Arabia but the RH there of course (at least in those days) was around 25% I think. Thus the evaprative coolers had dry air to work with and increasing the humidity was a 'good thing' comfort wise.
I agree that in the UK evaporative coolers are unlikely to be useful.
--
Chris Green ( snipped-for-privacy@x-1.net)

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"sw" wrote | Grunff wrote: | > [blinds] | I will vouch for this. We've just fitted white blinds made of two | different reasonably open weave fabrics (I'll skip details of fabric | and design as it might be too girly) to all the upstairs windows on | the sw-facing front of the house. Leaving the blinds down all day | in hot weather has significantly reduced the temperature in the rooms.
I have pinoleum blinds at the windows and keep them down until the sun moves round from that side of the building (which usually coincides with about the time I'm dressed and able to open the blinds anyway).
They let the air (traffic fumes) through but do help keep out the heat.
Owain
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Forget it - they don't work. The reason they don't work is that what you really want to do is reduce the humidity, and they do the opposite. Whilst an evaporative air cooler might manage to reduce the temperature a bit, the room will actually feel worse. They work in hot dry climates -- we never get those here.
For more details, see: http://groups.google.com/groups?selm r4kq%24if0%241%40new-usenet.uk.sun.com
--
Andrew Gabriel

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@cucumber.demon.co.uk (Andrew Gabriel) wrote in message writes:

They dont work in a UK climate, they rely on the latent heat of evaporation of the water to cool the air...the evaporation doesnt occur in our high humidity heat so the cooling doesnt work.
We used them with much success in country NSW, 45degC in very low humidity and got a temperature drop of 7degC, but I wouldnt bother in the UK.
Ian
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 10 Jul 2003 06:12:37 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@physics.ox.ac.uk (Ian) wrote:

Problem solved. I bought a floor fan that is sitting under my desk and, even as I speak, is cooling me to an almost uncomfortably cold degree...its lovely.
Of course, it hasn't solved the problem upstairs, but I'm all right jack :-)
Brian
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

We still haven't had the worst the climate can throw at us. Plus the humidity has been plummeting all day.
You really can't beat a proper split air-con system. I've experimented with everything else and there's nothing to touch it.
Are your papers flying around the room yet?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 10 Jul 2003 14:56:46 +0000, 666 snipped-for-privacy@hack.powernet[dot]co[dot]uk (Simon Gardner) wrote:

Nope, cos its a floor fan. Its under the angle of the (L-shaped) desk, pointing up at me; papers blowing around is the very reason why I bought one like that, instead of a desk mounted or pedestal fan. Getting a lovely cold breeze up the shorts, and no papers going anywhere.
Brian
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Still, for comfort, you can't beat a nice 20 inside when it's 28.5 in the shade outside as it was today. And when it gets to 32 - as it certainly will within the next month or so - it will still be 20 indoors. I *love* my aircon.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 10 Jul 2003 17:56:10 UTC, 666 snipped-for-privacy@hack.powernet[dot]co[dot]uk (Simon Gardner) wrote:

Was 32 today here in NE Kent - by two different thermometers, both in shade!
--
Bob Eager
rde at tavi.co.uk
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 10 Jul 2003 23:21:48 UTC, 666 snipped-for-privacy@hack.powernet[dot]co[dot]uk (Simon Gardner) wrote:

I agree...but then I don't live in a Stephenson screen! It was just bloody hot for me!
--
Bob Eager
rde at tavi.co.uk
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@spamcop.net (Bob Eager) wrote:

Certainly, it was - outside. The point of using Met Office criteria - which I do with my outdoors temperature kit is it gives you an accurate reference with respect to weather forecasts etc and a genuine comparative measure. Call me fussy, but if I give a temperature, I like it to be genuinely meaningful. (That's how I can state with certainty that there was a whole week with peak temperatures above 32 last year.) But you are right. It was bloody unpleasant today and Monday looks like being worse.
I'll just shuffle of to uk.sci.weather now, eh?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 11 Jul 2003 00:06:12 UTC, 666 snipped-for-privacy@hack.powernet[dot]co[dot]uk (Simon Gardner) wrote:

I remember all that stuff...was responsible for the equipment at school for a year...but no doubt some of the technology was different in those long-ago days!
--
Bob Eager
rde at tavi.co.uk
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 10 Jul 2003 15:02:45 +0100, <nightjar> wrote:

Are you not planning on connecting either the heat exchanger or the air con unit to the wall?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

at
to
greatest
They are designed as free-standing units and have worked that way in one of my factories for more than a year. There is a provision for hanging the heat exchanger on the wall, which would presumably be required if I were not using them at ground level.
Colin Bignell
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 10 Jul 2003 21:29:43 +0100, <nightjar> wrote:

Ah, so (if Iunderstand you), its a portable (free standing) air con unit, installed at ground level, (and with the heat exchanger resting on the ground outside?). Which answers my next question about how you were going to wire the thing into the mains in your allotted 30 mins installation time :-)
Brian
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
...

I'm not sure that something that needs a 50mm hole in the wall and a spanner to disconnect the umbilical that passes through it really counts as portable. Transportable, perhaps. Apart from that, yes. There is a nice concrete slab, about 0.5m wide, down the whole side of that side of the house for the heat exchanger to stand on.

Using the 13 amp plug it is fitted with.
My point was really that effective air conditioning can be a quick fix, if you are using the right equipment. OTOH, the clean room I recently had done took three men about a week and it needed a fork lift truck to position the external heat exchanger.
Colin Bignell
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
bigbrian wrote:

If you mena what I think you mean, at current humidities (just about 100%) evapiorative cooling simply won't work. Period.
Get proper refrigeration.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.