Electrics and Expandable foam

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On 20 Oct 2003, Terry D wrote

It does sound a bit generous -- from a diy perspective, I'd have thought that 3 hours or so would do for lifting the upstairs floorboards; cutting the existing cable out; inserting a wooden plate; running a new cable from a junction box; installing the new light fitting to plate; and replacing the floorboards. (Would one really try and clean the foam off existing wires instead of running a new circuit cable to the fitting?)
That said, the guy doesn't sound like a cowboy to me -- I'd have thought if he was, he would've pushed harder for the day's work, and not have advised getting the NHBC involved to get the builder to do it.
--
Cheers,
Harvey
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"> > Firstly I would advise you to avoid this 'electrician' like the

My number one hated job. Have you tried lifting a "floorboard" in a new house?
-- Adam
snipped-for-privacy@blueyonder.co.uk
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On 21 Oct 2003, ARWadsworth wrote

Ah: no, I haven't. The newest house of the 5 I've owned was built in the 1930s.
What makes it a tougher job in new houses?
(I though they used sheet material, which I've generally found simpler to lift than traditional floorboards.)
--
Cheers,
Harvey
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Apart, that is, from having to move more furniture and carpet - and then finding that the chipboard sheet is held down by skirting board on 3 sides!
Roger
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sides!
What you need is the Trend Routabout. Absolutely ideal for making inspection hatches in chipboard floors. You can find more info here <http://www.trendmachinery.co.uk/routabout/ . The basic kit is about 40, and while additional rings aren't that cheap (approx 2.50 each) you shouldn't need that many.
Cheers Clive
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The boat safety scheme for the inland waterways (MOT for boats) does not permit laying PVC cable in polystyrene insulation unless in conduit to prevent contact. The reason is that the PVC goes brittle and on a boat you do get vibration. Also circuits are predominatly 12V with high current. A short circuit for a light (2Amp) is 2.5mm. A long circuit for a fridge (5Amp) on a 60ft narrowboat needs to be 10mm cable. And the invertor needs to be close to the battery.
On Mon, 20 Oct 2003 19:11:49 +0000 (UTC), "A K"

Lawrence
usenet at lklyne dt co dt uk
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