Electrical isolation required for mechanical work?

Mechanical repairs required to a 3 MW, 11 KV standby generator engine. Then genset also operates on a triad system. The control side will be isolated to ensure that the prime mover does not start during repairs. Is there a need for electrical isolation of the HV alternator & busbar breaker during repairs? No work will be carried out on the electrical side. TIA
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Not qiute the right group, but before working on HV equipment I would be looking for a permit to work and proof of isolation from all poits of supply. If you do not know this then maybe you should not be working on the kit!!
Regards
Steve Dawson
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 1 Feb 2004 17:28:15 -0000, BIGEYE wrote:

Yes! Accidents, when they happen, occur not because one thing went wrong but because two or three things went wrong. It might be a change of staff, a fitter or engineer who says 'Whilst we've got it out of service.....', or even a moment of complete idiocy on the part of the person doing the work. Like it not, it does happen, and the very first thing the HSE will look at is the procedures in place.
I'd go so far as to consider some form of permit to work on the set. Something that specifies how the set is isolated, how it is inhibited from start up in the event of a mains failure during the works, and most importantly, specifying the *exact* limits of the work.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 01/02/2004 BIGEYE opined:-

Isolating the control side alone is totally inadequate. To prevent the possibility of the unit motoring, you need to be absolutely certain that there is no possibility of the unit becoming energised. You should wind out the breaker unit, lock it out and lodge the keys with a responsible person.
To prevent any possibility of the unit being accidentally cranked over, whatever method of providing the cranking power should be removed. If air, remove a section of pipe, if battery (unlikely) remove the leads. Again lodge these items with a responsible person.
Simply turning them off is not adequate, as they can just as easily be turned back on.
You will also require suitable notices to be displayed on the equipment where these isolations have taken place, indicating that it has been disconnected and that the equipment is being worked on.
All of this needs to be carefully documented before you start and each item ticked off as it is done and witnessed. I am surprised that there is no 'permit to work' system in place, for such large and dangerous plant.
--

Regards,
Harry (M1BYT) (Lap)
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Thanks guys for the replies. A detailed switching schedule will be prepared before isolation. Breaker will be off & racked down. Isolation & earthing drawing completed. It was the mechanical components I was querying as no work will be performed on the electrical side. But this will still be isolated. Of course, safety locks & caution signs will be placed where necessary. In addition to the HV isolation & PT isolation, the compressor air line will be removed, fuel line as well. Battery negative lead will be removed and LV control panel isolated.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Harry Bloomfield retched Electrical isolation required for mechanical work? onto my recliner:

Such a cruel bastard you are.
--

Phil K.

http://philkyle2003.reachme.at /
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.