Drilling 4mm Steel

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sure, search uk.d-i-y for thornton, toilet, door. But yes, this one was serious.

hehe.
lol, never had any problems doing it before, but then it was always 1.6mm or so.

Well it has a very different angle to the usual masonry, so maybe on reflection its not a masonry bit, its TCT anyway, with the cutting edge at 90 degrees to the cuttee.

Here youre surely kidding. I've made many a hole that took longer than that.

:)
lol! too funny.

I didnt miss that, no. I'm not the kind that gives up easily.
Thanks for the laugh :) Yes OK, I didnt get it quite right eh.
Regards, NT
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Can
be a

may
here,
Masonry
bit,
again,
drill
Glad you saw the funny side of your original post.
Anyway, most important thing is - have you had more success with another HSS drill bit? If not, and it is still taking ages (ok, 2 mins not really too long) then it could be a bit more than mild steel
All the best Rob
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Hi, In case you didnt see my reply, yes, all done ty.
Regards, NT
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...

bit,
I hope _you_ are kidding. I don't take that long to put a 5mm hole down the centre of a 6mm x 100mm long piece of 416 stainless steel.
Colin Bignell
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No, I've done many holes that have taken over 2 minutes, mostly in brick or concrete. Even the 4mm took over 2 minutes a hole, but done it surely was.
Regards, NT
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purpose'
the
I suspect you need to either buy a drill sharpener, or buy a more powerful drill, or get a chart of drill speeds. The only holes I recall taking that long were the ones I cut with core drills for the bathroom wastes and for the fan. However, each included going outside and up a ladder, to drill from that side, once the guide drill had broken through.
Colin Bignell
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the
I think you mean, "give us the job and we'll finish the tools"
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In an earlier contribution to this discussion,

If it's ordinary mild steel, you only need decently sharp HSS drills - starting with a small one, and working up in diameter to the final size. It helps enormously if you can mount your drill in a pillar drill stand, rather than hand-holding it - since that enables you to apply a lot of pressure with less risk of breaking the drill bit. It also helps if your electric drill has a 2-speed gearbox - in which case you should use the lower speed setting.
If you don't know whether it's mild steel, test it with a sharp hacksaw or the edge of a triangular section file. If it cuts easily, it will drill easily with the right kit. If you can't cut or file it, it's probably something more exotic than mild steel - and you probably won't be able to drill it either.
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You need a HSS (high speed steel) bit - which will probably be dark blue/black in colour. It's possible the general purpose one you tried wasn't made for steel. The sheds sell them separately or in sets.
You need to apply a fair bit of pressure - not like drilling wood. Use a slow speed, about 1000 rpm, and start with about 5 mm. Use some light oil to help the cutting process and keep things cool - if the drill overheats it'll go blunt and need sharpening - not easy if you're not used to doing this. If you've got a drill stand it makes it much easier to apply vertical pressure with less risk of breaking the drill. You really need somewhere approaching your entire body weight, pressure wise, to drill steel easily.

I'm amazed you got anywhere - the cutting angles of a masonry drill are all wrong for steel.
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wrote:

Thanks Dave, this explains it all. I'll dig out another smaller bit and try again, at lower speed, with oil, and a lot more pressure.
Thanks to you and the other helpful contributors, NT
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On Sat, 20 Dec 2003 00:22:33 +0000 (GMT), Dave Plowman wrote:

Or drilling anything other than ABS or pine...
IMHO the order of importance is:
1) Correct drill material - HSS in this case. 2) Sharp with correct angles. (New drills aren't really sharp BTW...) 3) Correct speed, just a few hundred RPM. 4) Lubrication/cooling, probably only really required if trying to drill a big hole in one go. You need a pilot hole around the size of the web of the next drill (ish you don't want to try and take "to much" in one go. 5) Rigid mounting of drill and work, this really does make a great difference to the accuracy of holes. Small pillar drills are available for <50 OK they aren't precision instruments but are much better than nothing.

A good sharp drill will just cut and produce nice spirals of swarf without that much pressure.
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N. Thornton wrote:

Very slow drill speed and lubrication - soapy water from memory, and good quality standard drill bit.
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The obvious comment is that the drill bit was broken. I've an 8mm & 10mm drill bit that takes about 10minutes to go thro T304. Well it was T304 when it started, it usually ends up several colours later.
More seriously, there are a lot of "one-use" drill bits out there and that includes some from B&Q and even some from proper jobber shops.
If the person was drilling stainless, anything less than a fresh quality drill bit can make it an excitingly long experience if 4mm or more. The fact it is causing discolouration means it is heating, not cutting and pretty obviously the bit is broken - probably by age/heat/dropping. -- Dorothy Bradbury www.stores.ebay.co.uk/panaflofan for fans, books & other items
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The best drill types for metal are center drills,cut through like butter,but not available in the sheds go to a tool shop or engineering supplies.You will be amazed at the speed.
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Well thanks to all I'm now the proud owner of a nice new set of holes :) Cheers!
PS I did em with unmarked bright steel drills, couldnt find the HSS ones for some reason.
Regards, NT
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