Double glazing - two misted windows

Our house was built seven years ago. The house came with UPVC double glazing installed.
Both south facing bedrooms have a double glazed unit consisting of two opening windows on either side of a central, non opening, window. In both rooms, one of the opening windows looks as though there is condensation inside.
What are the "Window Doctor" type services like? Would they be able to fix this sort of thing? I presume both windows are "sealed units"? How much would such a service cost? What are peoples views of this sort of thing? Is it something I could *easily* fix myself?
Any info, horror stories etc gratefully received.
Nozza
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Our house was built seven years ago. The house came with UPVC double glazing installed.
Both south facing bedrooms have a double glazed unit consisting of two opening windows on either side of a central, non opening, window. In both rooms, one of the opening windows looks as though there is condensation inside.
What are the "Window Doctor" type services like? Would they be able to fix this sort of thing? I presume both windows are "sealed units"? How much would such a service cost? What are peoples views of this sort of thing? Is it something I could *easily* fix myself?
Any info, horror stories etc gratefully received.
Nozza
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and
glazier)
doing
Excellent - that's good to know.
D
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Could I jack a question onto this thread please?
We are currently getting quotes to replace our windows with double glazed units. The reasons for going to d-g are to get away from those ugly metal windows, replace the rotting 30 year old woodwork, and to stop condensation on the glass. We have no draughts or noise problems in this house.
We have not been offered sealed units by anyone.... always those units with the drain slots along the bottom.
Is this going to be ok?
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Tony Williams.

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There are holes in the separator which allow moisture through to a dissicant in it, but the outside edge of the sandwich is sealed. The dissicant absorbs the moisture in the unit when it was built, and might absorb a small amount which leaks in, but when it's all used up and more gets in, then the window mists up.
Some reasons the outside seal might break are:
o poor drainage from the channel the window sits in, so it sits in a puddle, which might freeze in winter,
o seal damaged during installation,
o unit just not well made (in extremes, they have to handle perhaps a 40 temperature difference and differential thermal expansion between the two panes).
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Andrew Gabriel

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Not so much why they 'might' break more why they 'will' break - they're all doomed! Double glazing is highly obsolescent and not very cost effective, if at all.
cheers
Jacob
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     snipped-for-privacy@jpbutler.demon.co.uk (jacob) writes:

The first double glazing in my house had only a single failed unit after some 25 years, and I think that was because a potential burglar tried to lever it out at some point (and failed). These frames had a waterproof seal between the outer glass surface and the frame, which stops water getting to the glass unit seal.
Modern frames have a rubber strip which stops water pouring into the frame, but doesn't even attempt to be fully waterproof, so the glass units often sit in a puddle inside the frame, depending how well constructed the frame drainage is.
I certainly wouldn't argue with it not being cost effective -- just about any other energy conservation method has a shorter payback period, and usually very much shorter.
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Andrew Gabriel

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We have some DG hardwood patio doors/windows. I'm not sure of the age but at least 20 years old, quite possibly more. We do now have a couple of failed units, but I don't feel the age they ahev lasted is that bad. Esp. as I don't think the design of the frames is that good (the DG units are not bedded into very much sealant, or in drained frames unlike more modern windows tend to be.

Indeed, replacing windows just to get DG doesn't make sense, but there are good reasons for replacing single glazed windows with DG if the windows need replacing anyway.
No significant condensation, and much more comfortable rooms are two benefits we had from replacing the old single glazed bay windows with DG ones last year.
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Chris French, Leeds

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On 16 Jul 2003 10:39:28 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@ukmisc.org.uk (Huge) wrote:

Not well. You get condensation between the panes. I had secondary double glazing some years back and I'd never want to go back.
Andrew
Do you need a handyman service? Check out our web site at http://www.handymac.co.uk
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Hello Nozza

Units have failed. There is no onsite way of repairing them, anyone who says different is a bodger.

Sometimes just a salesman, sometimes a genuine guy.

You need to have the units replaced, sorry. Hopefully they're stock sizes (common in modern houses) and it's an off-the-shelf replacement.
Either installation or manufacture could have caused the premature failure, btw, maybe you have some sort of warrantee with your house that may include this? Maybe your insurance does?
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Simon Avery, Dartmoor, UK
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Thanks for all the responses here - muchly appreciated. I contacted a few double glazing repair firms and had a chat with them and have someone coming around to measure for replacement units.
The company was up front with all costs, (including the need for toughened glass for windows under 800mm from floor level - they'll measure that to confirm - but I don't think I need it)
Cost of "repair" i.e. replacement units for two windows about 100cm tall and 45 cm wide including fitting and VAT about 115 (depends on exact measurements).
Noz
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Used a local independent glazier who installed two new sealed units.
Total cost 90 including fitting.
Thanks again for all the advice
Noz
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