Double Glazing and FEMSA

Is FEMSA just another cudgel to scare homeowners into paying over the odds?
I'm looking around for quotes for double glazing, I have had one installer become abusive and almost threatening when I told him his quote was too high (by almost 2000 compared to another installer using the same profile)). He started blustering on about how I would never be able to sell my house if the windows weren't installed by a FEMSA registered company and when I said I didn't believe him he became abusive and said something along the lines of 'don't come to me when you're in the sh*t then'. Fairly obviously, this won him my business and I now think this guy is a god who deserves a position alongside the Safestyle rep in DG heaven.
Having read a little on FEMSA I understand you can actually get the certificate from the local authority, does anyone have an idea of the requirements and cost?
--
Clint

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On Sun, 2 Nov 2003 16:52:15 +0000, Clint Sharp

This is another government scam to be able to be seen to be improving building standards while pushing the cost onto the industry and the consumer.
FENSA operates a Competent Person Scheme which you can read about at www.odpm.gov.uk in the Building Regulations section. For windows this specifically relates to part L1 (energy conservation) and part N (glazing).

When replacing windows, you have two choices:
- Use a FENSA registered contractor. Undoubtedly there is a cost to belong to FENSA, but this should not result in a 2k price hike per customer.
- Use a non-approved contractor or do the work yourself and then submit a Building Notice to the Building Control dept. of the local authority. There is a fee for this which is based on the cost of the work. DIYing does not help you with the fee - they will charge you as though the work had been done professionally. However, you could still make a saving on the labour content of the job, just not the fee. IIRC it's about 50/1000.
Unlike gas fitting, where the gas safety legislation does require professional fitters to belong to CORGI, which also forms a basis for competency to exempt from Building Notice; window fitting does not. However, you do ned to do one of the above.
Regarding the sale of the property, if you don't have an invoice from a FENSA installer or a building notice approval from the local authority, you could have a problem when selling. This lack of documentation would typically be picked up by a buyer's conveyancor.
However, at that point, you could go for a regularisation from the local authority. Peculiarly, the fees are the same as for a building notice and don't carry VAT, further demonstrating that not only is the legislation from the department run by our pugilistic pal a nonsense, but its implementation is as well.
.andy
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Re
Peculiarly, the fees are the same as for a building

Not quite; the fee is the BN fee plus 20%, but not no VAT (because we don't have any competition for Regularisation applications) so it is the same plus 2.5%
When we do B. Reg inspections we ensure L1 compliance (gap to glazing plus low E glass), safety glass where required, and that ventilation and means of escape (via new window) no worse than existing.
RT
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On Sun, 2 Nov 2003 19:04:43 -0000, a particular chimpanzee named
and produced:

And one might add, it's fairly easy to demonstrate at the time the windows are installed whether low-e glass has been used, a bit harder a few years later.
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easy to demonstrate at the time the

I thought we had established that the building regs require a maximum U-value, not a specific type of glazing? In which case, demonstrating low-e glass or not is not the issue.
Regards
Neil
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On 4 Nov 2003 01:31:46 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@the-joneses.org.uk (Neil Jones) wrote:

True, but I think if you look at the glass manufacturer and Part L1 specs. you will find that the only other way to achieve this is to use standard glass but triple glazed......
.andy
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Firstly, thanks for all the replies, second, would it be safe to assume that DG with Pilkington K glass would be OK?
Is there anywhere online I can get a copy of the regs for compliance, and anywhere that explains E, U and other thermal (I assume) ratings?
--
Clint

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http://www.odpm.gov.uk/stellent/groups/odpm_buildreg/documents/sectionhomepage/odpm_buildreg_page.hcsp
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