Dismantling fridge/freezer

Our old Electra F/F is dying and I want to dismantle it to use the compressor for "other purposes"...
(Before you say "you can't do that, you have to give it to a professional... etc" I will remind you that I am living in Turkey, unfortunately the CFC harmful gases will go to the atmosphere if it give it to a scrap merchant or do it myself...)
What is the best procedure to relieve the pressure in the system without gassing myself or causing a fountain of freon? (or whatever refrigerant it uses...) small hole with pin or cut a pipe and run?
(I have seen the compressors used to pump up car/bicycle tyres before now and a search on the net gave some hints about this as well)
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Abdullah Eyles wrote:

You just turn your head and cut one of the pipes (outdoors). Walk away until it's finished hissing, and you're done. I've done this at least half a dozen times in the past.
Make sure the compressor is upright when you do this, and that it has been upright for a couple of hours (with the main heat exchanger above it). Otherwise you're likely to lose all the oil along with the refrigerant.
Some fridges used ammonia as the refrigerant. When I was at school, I once removed the compressor from a fridge containing ammonia. That was an unpleasant experience. Just make sure you do it outside, away from other people/animals etc.
--
Grunff


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[26 lines snipped]

I thought ammonia based frigs didn't have compressors?
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On 22 Nov 2003 16:16:07 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@ukmisc.org.uk (Huge) wrote:

IIRC an old book of how things work that my father has, ammonia was used as a refrigerant in early compressor fridges as well as in those which operate(d) with a heat source. I am sure that I can also remember there being gas fridges in the past which presumably used a heat source in some way, but I can't think for a moment what the principle of operation would be.
.andy
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Ah, thank you. I didn't know that.

They use the heat of solution of ammonia in water. A heater drives the ammonia out of solution from the water, a radiator cools it, convection causes the water to circulate back into the frig, wherre the ammonia is redissolved and the heat of solution absorbed from the frig interior. Entirely silent and no moving parts.
My parents had one for 30-odd years until they emigrated to the USA and left it behind.
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(Huge) wrote:

Not only in the past - very much in the present for caravanners!
Caravan fridges invariably work on the absorption ("Electrolux") cycle principle - rather than having compressors - and usually have 3 alternative sources of heat: 1. Mains electricity 2. 12v DC (for use when travelling only - and powered by the towcar's alternator) 3. Calor Gas (for use on site when no mains electricity is available)
Roger
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Ammonia is still used in very large industrial fridges, like coldstore warehouses.
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Andrew Gabriel

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Huge wrote:

Yes, the water/ammonia mechanism you describe was used in heat-driven fridges, but neat ammonia was also used as a refrigerant in some old compressor driven ones.
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Ta.
You learn something old every day!
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On 22 Nov 2003 06:13:04 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com (Abdullah Eyles) wrote:

The compressors are very useful - but make sure you fit a pressure relief valve, although their capacity is low they will happily go up to inordinately high pressures (many hundreds of PSI) before something gives.
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Peter Parry.
http://www.wpp.ltd.uk/
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Just what can they be used for? I cant think of much offhand. I heard they make usable vacuum pumps, but must never be tipped up once de-fridged.
Regards, NT
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     snipped-for-privacy@meeow.co.uk (N. Thornton) writes:

Having learned how liquid nitrogen is made in O-level physics, I recall trying to get hold of one to make some. It would probably have never worked, but I never got to try.
I've got a freezer which is on it's last legs (has to wear a large incontinence nappy due to failed insulation). The compressor seems fine however, so I could perhaps try it with that one when I finally chuck it out.
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Andrew Gabriel

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On Wed, 26 Nov 2003 17:52:25 +0000, Andrew Gabriel wrote:

pressure than it was wont, without any lubrication in the working fluid which is now nirogen, and with much less flow through it to carry away waste heat.
However I'm looking forward to reding about what happens.
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Ed Sirett - Property maintainer and registered gas fitter.
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Ed Sirett wrote:

I used to mess around with compressors a lot, and they don't do too badly as long as you keep them upright and keep the oil in. I had one that was still pulling good vacuum after 2 years of vacuum use.
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How did you get the dust out?
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Gavin Gillespie
Giltbrook
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Gavin Gillespie wrote:

Presumably that's missing a smilie, right?
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Here it is ;o)
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Gavin Gillespie
Giltbrook
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On 26 Nov 2003 06:52:06 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@meeow.co.uk (N. Thornton) wrote:

Vacuum pumps, as you mentioned, excellent airbrush compressors (look at the ones sold for GBP100 plus and see how they are made). Good compressors where the need is pressure rather than volume - I know of a complex watering/misting system for orchids controlled entirely by pneumatic pressure from an old fridge compressor.
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Peter Parry.
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