Digital set-top boxes (slightly O/T) - weak signal area.

Page 2 of 8  
Jonathan Peters wrote:

Borrowing a box off someone would be the easy way ;) Do you have a decent local aerial installer? They should know what the reception is like, and they should be able to test your existing aerial installation for suitability. They'll charge though, naturally.
However, is the reason you don't want satellite because you simply don't want, or can't have, a dish? If the terrestrial reception proves to be too bad, then satellite with a FTV card may be the only realistic choice if you want the digital channels. A minidish may even be less intrusive than the aerial(s) you may end up needing otherwise... ;)
Lee
--
To reply use lee.blaver and ntlworld.com


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Is it still possible to get FTV cards?
Christian.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Christian McArdle wrote:

Yes, but they aren't free to obtain anymore :( From the UMTS news group faq (Jomtien):
"...If you want to receive these FTV channels without subscribing to Sky then you can ring 0870 054 1800 and ask for a card. The card will cost 23.50 and will last until the next card change which will probably be several years away..."
Lee
--
To reply use lee.blaver and ntlworld.com


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Lee Blaver wrote:

Err, but only until the end of January... http://www.free2view.tv /
Lee
--
To reply use lee.blaver and ntlworld.com


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Just had a quick shufti on Argos' website and it says:
"Please note that this product is excluded from the Argos 16-Day Money Back Guarantee. This does not affect your statutory rights"
I'm no expert on consumer law but somebody here will be, and will be able to tell you what your 'statutory rights' are. Is this one of those cases where would be legally obliged to take back an item as 'not fit for purpose' if returned in as new condition? Maybe it's just a meaningless disclaimer which attempts to dissuade punters from doing what you want to do!
Also - note that the cheapest box, ref 532/0448, is apparently not covered by the waiver. Maybe an accident, maybe not... but even if that's not the box you're after, there's nothing to stop you buying it, testing it, then returning it for an upgrade if it works for you, or a refund if it doesn't.
HTH David
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Lobster wrote:

The 'fit for purpose' route is a bit problematic. You could justifyabily return goods if they do not work as advertised (ie. faulty/missing features advertised on the box). You should also be able to return goods if you explained to the retailer you wanted a specific feature/purpose that wasn't on the box but only if the retailer either said it had that feature/would be suitable but when you tried it out found it didn't have it.
The grey area comes where you fail to explain to the retailer what you want. Eg. buy a Freeview adaptor that puts RGB signals out on the Scart. If you get it home and you find it doesn't have it - then you can't exactly claim that it wasn't fit for purpose because if you told the retailer what you wanted, then they *should* have said it doesn't have that feature. If they mistakenly said it did have that feature, then you can return it as in my first paragraph.
When it comes to Freeview boxes, they all say something like - subject to reception - which means that its difficult to claim that its not fit for purpose as they've made you aware that reception varies. If you said to a retailer "I want this box to work in this postcode" they're likely to say "I can't guarantee it - you buy it at your risk". Some retailers may allow you to return it, but I don't belive they're required to - unless they said it would definitely work.
Would you expect to return a TV to Comet just because your aerial was a dodgy one, in the loft, pointing the wrong way and you couldn't get a reception with it? They would likely say that it was an aerial problem (proved by putting a signal into it from the store) and no refund.
As Argos' 16 day return isn't a statutory right (AFAIK) its their discretion what they allow you to return if it isn't faulty. Whilst Argos may allow a TV return in the above situation (though they do claim it must be *unused* for a 16 day return) they can pick and chose what they allow to be returned within their 16 day policy.
Hope that helps.
David
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Lobster wrote:

Just buy it online or by telephone order, then you're covered by the distance selling regulations that apply to any retailer. You can then return it within 7 days for any reason you like.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Tiny niggle, but I thought 28 days was the magic number?
F.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The Dawoo ds608p?, setpal is reckoned to have the most sensitive tuner at the moment and in Worcester, at Apollo 2000 they are 59.99.
Dave
--
And you were born knowing all about ms windows....??


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

If I were you rather than sod about with half way answers I'd consult a local aerial rigger, ask at the local TV shops for someone recommended, and then get a quote for the best aerial in your area for the appropriate transmitter. The use of a wideband aerial isn't the necessary best answer for all transmitters. The postcode system of prediction cannot take into account the local variations especially in hilly, urban, and tree infested areas.
for instance we live just south of Cambridge and here for analogue we would normally use an A group aerial channels 21-34 however most of the digital mux's are around channels 40 odd with one odd one at channel 67 so we have a, sodded if I can remember the number now, but its one that covers the top end of the band a fair bit better. The analogue channels which are transmitted at far higher powers are compensation for the losses of the lack of aerial gain at the lower frequencies and hence the whole thing works very well indeed.
Now there is a school of thought with digital transmission that sez either it works or doesn't which isn't exactly true there is a halfway stage with the picture lockup and blocking.
My advice would be to look on it all as a good long term investment as think of how many hours you will be using it for, so a few quid spent now will ensure many good hours of viewing.
One thing not normally known about the freeview services is that they carry a good range of radio services as well. Almost all the BBC output and others, like Jazz FM, kiss, mojo , magic etc, and the audio quality on most is very good indeed. Most boxes have audio sockets to allow connection to a hi-fi system. In fact the audio is better than the DAB system!....
--
Tony Sayer


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
tony sayer wrote in message ...

So is there ANY chance of good reception from an internal loft aerial? I have a friend who is reluctant to have an external aerial on her cute little cottage but gets good reception (apart from C5) with an internal aerial.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
stuart noble wrote:

I don't see why not. Thats what I shall be trying anyway.
You can get a decent picture out of a short length of wire sticking p teh back of teh telly, as Clive Sinclair demonstrated once when he had a roof top antenna coupled to a booster and aerial radiating under the booth where an early version of his microvision was being demonstrated at a show....:-)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
writes

Ah! Clive. Invariably the showman!.....
--
Tony Sayer


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

There is a chance, but no guarantee. Another alternative is to mount one in the garden, either on a pole, an outbuilding or a tree.
Christian.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Yes there is. But it is dependant on many varied things. The location and power of the transmitter and digital TV transmitters aren't "overpowered" by any means, and I'm not going to go into the reasons for that hereon!.
The location of the building, the height of the loft, the size and gain of the aerial and channel suitability, the composition of the roof covering and lining, the amount and number of the other buildings in the line to the transmitter, the location of numerous things in the loft, the type and length of the aerial cable used, etc!.
The only really effective way is to try it and see but take it from me if you're in a marginal area, it will be rather problematic.....
--
Tony Sayer


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Yes, we have a loft aerial in an area which most FreeView predictors either say marginal or won't work at all. We actually get *all* the FreeView channels with little problem using a good (51 element) aerial in the loft.
--
Chris Green ( snipped-for-privacy@x-1.net)

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

It's possible to get good reception with a set top aerial under some conditions.
However, wish I had a quid for everyone who says they've got a 'perfect' picture when it's anything but...
--
*Do infants enjoy infancy as much as adults enjoy adultery?

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@argonet.co.uk London SW 12
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

It's quite difficult to get anything in between "as good as it gets" and no picture at all on digital. If the signal is marginal then you may get the occasional freeze but not much else, apart from total loss of picture.
--
Chris Green ( snipped-for-privacy@x-1.net)

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@isbd.co.uk wrote in message wrote:

I don't agree. We live within 3 miles of Sandy Heath, which makes it easy to get an excellent signal, and of course it's easy to mess it up if you want to experiment...
I've found it's easy to have terrible analogue with near-perfect digital, excellent analogue with limited digital, and any combination in between. What's more, it's very easy to get stop-start digital, mostly glitchy digital, mostly OK digital, or digital which works most of the time but has a very slight freeze/jump once or twice an hour.
For now, we have a home made experimental log periodic aerial I made from plastic sheeting and aluminium foil, suspended from two nails in the loft. It cracked the analogue channel five problem (except in the middle of summer), but we get occasional jumps on digital BBC1 (not BBC4 though - strange, given the frequencies at Sandy Heath).
It's a pity this "free" aerial got so close, because it's now hard to justify the expense of sending a professional up on the roof.
Cheers, David.
P.S. This question would be more at home in uk.tech.digital-tv where you will already find many answers!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Ah yes Dave. One man's perfeck piccy is another man's....
Especially when you've had the benefit of seeing what the broadcasters *are* capable of.....
--
Tony Sayer


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.