Damp Course levels on new build

Should a damp course on a newly built house be over 150mm all around the house?
At the front of ours the top soil is OVER the damp course level. It may have been the rush to get the houses finished b4 Christmas, but still its poor standards. I have highlighted in in bold on our (long) snagging list.
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On 4 Jan 2004 01:16:42 -0800, a particular chimpanzee named snipped-for-privacy@kirk123.co.uk (Paul K) randomly hit the keyboard and produced:

Yes, apart from the door threshold which should have some form of drainage channel against the wall or be covered by a canopy.

Confirm with the Building Control body (local authority or NHBC) that they have done a completion inspection, and whether they have any other snags.
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On 4 Jan 2004 01:16:42 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@kirk123.co.uk (Paul K) wrote:

Yes.
Haul their arses back and if they don't respond quickly, call building control.
Unfortunately the pressure is always on with site agents to meet completion targets and their minds are on that, not on snagging.
Keep them on a very tight lead and give them days, not weeks to do the work. Once people drift away from the site, it becomes hard to get them back.
On one occasion I had to threaten a major construction company with a winding up order and pull their MD out of a board meeting to get action. On another, neighbours and I arranged a small completion ceremony for the chairman of the building firm (who couldn't resist publicity). Local papers and TV were invited as well and he didn't quite get the publicity that he had hoped for.
.andy
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Paul K wrote:

Yes, if you mean over 150mm from the soil level.

Indeed. It is also well worth getting the earth removed to a reasonable depth all round te house and gravel filling the area. Even if the soil goes back on top afterwards. hat way you get no puddling arond the house.

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Thanks for the replies, the NHBC have inspected and passed the house apparently, I was waiting for the certificate from the solicitor to see who signed it off before calling the NHBC, but I'm sure the builders will fix it to building standards :) The builders will be around for at least 9 months so plently of time to keep on at them.
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On 4 Jan 2004 10:44:51 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@kirk123.co.uk (Paul K) wrote:

The NHBC aren't even capable of passing water.......

The question is who's....

Don't let it go on for anything like this time or let yourself get into the mode of pleading with them to do you a favour. IME, they will just take advantage.
.andy
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Paul K wrote:

ramp, where the level has to be higher than the DPC?
I noticed when the council re-paved our village shopping area, giving each shop level entry, this put significant amounts of block paving above the level of the existing DPC. There was no visible sign of any precautionary measures.
Chris
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Chris J Dixon Nottingham UK
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Chris J Dixon wrote:

This is something that has to be done for disabled access.
What you do is build a cantilever slab, that ALMOST bridges the DPC, but doesn't quite touch. Then use gravel to backfill. Hoping the shingle won't carry water up over the DPC. In any case you can bring the DPC up vertically in the ramp area as well.
In section, picture the DPC coming out of teh wall an extendeing upwards to floor level, and floor level extended out of the building across edge of vertical DPC, down a sloping ramp to ground level below DPC.

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Part M building regs make this compulsory ........ a typical way is to install a horizontal dpc at the point where the ramp touches the building, and also use de-bonding of any horizontal ties to ensure any movement cannot affect structure of wall.
Rick
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