cutting soil pipe


Hi, next job on SWMBO's list of tasks to stop me having a weekend is a new bog. The existing one has an outlet almost at floor level. The soil pipe runs across the littlest room about a fingers thickness from the floor and the loo outlet enters via a "Y" in the middle ( crap description probably but I can't do drawings on this bloody thing that look anything like they're supposed to). The new throne has its outlet about 8" from the deck and it's close coupled to its cistern. So , finally, as the new loo is going to be closer to the wall and I'm going to use an elbow, the "Y" piece of the soil pipe is going to need to be turned 90 degrees from the front to the top (if you see what I mean). It would appear to be solvent welded so I'm going to have to cut it then rejoin it but how? Presumably it'll need to be pretty square and I can't see how to get a saw in as it's tight to the wall as well as the floor. What about joining it back together - is there a rubber tube / jubilee clip arrangement or will it require 2 couplings. Tried to interest several plumbers in the job (like others I ain't too keen on the contents of the pipe) but the only one who quoted wanted 40 / hour and said to reckon on 5-6 hours - my arse! Thanks for reading this far ( Tolstoy was an amateur at long tales) Richard
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... and a special BIG thankyou to Blueyonder who have probably the crappest news server in the virtual world. Sorry for double posting, Richard
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The existing pan outlet points straight back to the wall almost at floor level. The new one is higher but, because its close coupled it's closer to the wall. I've got an elbow that'll drop straight down onto the soil pipe but I need to turn the soil pipe entry to the top. Just to make things interesting the soil pipe is 3" (like drain pipe) it comes up from the ground floor, turns 90 degrees to the right outside on the landing (it's boxed in), goes along the back wall of the toilet out the other side then naffs off through the wall and up into the air to roof height. The fitting where the pan joins the stack is like a swept "T". Hope that's clearer - ish TIA, Richard
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Ah Haaaaaa !!!! Now I'm with you.
I take it that the original plumber has used 82 mm and not 3 inch Soil Pipe ?
This may work if you take your time.
A kettle of boiling water and a narrow bladed wood chisel will be needed for this technique.
Slowly pour the boiling water ( keep the kettle boiling for as long as possible before pouring it ) over one of the seams between the existing branch and pipework, then start to push the chisel in between the joint until you can break the seal. I've also done the same thing with a hot air paint stripper gun.
The point is to soften the pipe as much as possible to make it easy to pull apart, and the technique with the boiling water or hot air gun works well.
Once you can break the seal on the joints, then it is just a case of turning the existing branch through ninety degrees until it points toward the ceiling, and get a "P" to "S" Trap conversion fitting from the DIY Store.
Hope this is of some help. And remember that the soil pipe and cement (glue) is not really meant to take boiling water, or any high heat, for long periods of time, so it softens enough to pull apart quite easily.
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postings but we got there in the end ;-) I'll give this method a try at the weekend and let you know how I get on. Thanks, Richard
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