Cupped oak worktops....

been offered 2 x new 3m solid oak kitchen worktops but they are cupped across their widths.... Placed together with cups inwards, one can get a little finger between their centres, whilst their edges are touching...
What hopes of remedying this? & how? TIA
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Jim K


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On 2016-08-28, jim <k> wrote:

If they're thick enough, run them through a planer/thicknesser.
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On 28/08/16 18:37, Huge wrote:

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jim <k> wrote:

You're doooooomed! ;-)
Alternatively, rip it into 1" wide strips, turn every alternate strip over and glue it all back together. Then run it through a planer and Bob's your uncle.
Tim
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On 28/08/2016 20:08, Tim+ wrote:

Half a cm of deflection over the width of a 0.6m wide board dies not sound excessive. One could probably get it to warp back with application of moisture, however I expect it would be easy to simply pull it flat when fitting with a few screws.
(remember to leave a little front to back wiggle room on the screws since a real wood top will change width seasonally).
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On Monday, August 29, 2016 at 12:49:29 AM UTC+1, John Rumm wrote:

Which all merely confirms to me the sheer lunacy of solid wood worktops for kitchens and as for 'butcher block' worktops which are no more butcher block than my arse but instead strip laminations
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On 29/08/16 08:46, fred wrote:

I have solid wooden worktops made of pitch pine, 2" thick.
It is brilliant - pitch pine is basically waterproof without oiling.
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On 29/08/16 10:24, Tim Watts wrote:

I used block type solid oak worktops. They are fine except around a very wet area, The sink area rotted despite being treated
That was then changed to granite. Best worktop yet for me although Coram looks good to, but I never tried it.
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On Sunday, 28 August 2016 18:06:07 UTC+1, jim wrote:

If they are thick enough by planing them down. If not, screwing substantial bits of wood crosswise underneath. Or a combination of the two.
Probably not possible to completely flatten them. The cause is that the original tree was not properly assessed when it was cut up.
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On 28/08/16 18:06, jim wrote:

No real cure, but slicing into narrower pieces, and truing up the edges gluing and then planer-thicknessing the composite should work.
tangential ok will always cup - massively - with humidity changes.
And if you bolt it to an immovable object, it will split...

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On 28/08/16 18:06, jim wrote:

little movement if properly done, but it will be really hard to fit and fix them if they aren't flat on the day you do it.
Correct the cupping like this:
Lay the worktop concave side up and lightly wet that side, keeping it damp for many hours until the whole thing is flatish. If you are in the room you can do it by wiping it over every 30 mins. If you want to do it overnight then careful! don't overdo it but use something like damp jcloths covered in polythene to try to keep the worktop moist.
Overnight, 8-12 hours should be enough time but you can always do it again. Yes, I do have some experience of this.
Once flat enough get them fixed down pronto with strong fixings. I favour screws from underneath at the rear and screws in 25mm washers through oversized (20mm) holes in the unit carcase to allow movement at the front. Expansion brackets are a bit flimsy but sometimes needs must.
Overnight, 8-12 hours should be enough time but you can always do it again. Yes, I do have some experience of this.
TW
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replying to TimW, 1nippert wrote: Hello Tim was going to try your advice as adding weight to them doesn't seem to achieve alot. Not wanting to sound to silly when you say concave facing up do you mean as if I spoon was lead on a table so the sides are up off the floor ? Thanks. Tom.
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1nippert wrote:

Yes, heaven forfend you sound silly.
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On 11/10/16 14:44, 1nippert wrote:

Yes
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    jim <k> writes:

First, how/where were they stored? This might correct itself if stored properly for a few months with even humidity and good ventilation on both sides.
Saw a carpender work around this by using a circular saw to make lots of regular spaced cuts in the back the full length of the worktop and depth perhaps 2/3rds of the thickness, which made it flexiable enough to screw down flat to some 2x1 cross timbers across the bottom. He said there was still a risk it might crack, but there was nothing to lose as it wasn't usable otherwise. Note that the screw fixings must not be tight and must be able to slide as the worktop gets wider and narrower with humidity changes, or it will split. I have a tabletop with similar construction and the screws use well oversized holes with mudguard washers under the heads, and (this top not being cupped), the cross timbers do correctly feel a bit loose.
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