Critall Windows.

Hi, we moved into a flat approx 4 months ago, I didn't take much notice of the windows,although they're critall framed ones, but my main worry is with the onset of autumn/winter, these type of windows if my memory serves me right tend to suffer terribly from damp. My question is, before the cold damp weather arrives is there anything that I can treat these windows with? Unfortunately the terms of the lease state that I can't change the windows for more modern double glazed UPVC types. Any help would be appreciated.
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On Sun, 17 Aug 2003 20:26:21 +0100, "Mark Fry"

Damp? Critall windows produce entirely new life forms in the winter. The pink, purple, green and yellow growths exist nowhere else on earth. The dripping slime crawls off the windowsill to attack the cat and invade your lungs with spores that the writers of Star Trek would sell their souls for. The rotting paintwork and howling gales blowing through the gaps must be considered to be character building.

Flamethrower? Having had a couple of decades of these damnable windows courtesy of Her Majesty there are two cures. The first is to maintain an ambient temperature within each room of 30-40 deg C. This keeps the window marginally above freezing point. The second is copious supplies of bleach (industrial strength) and a tanker of mould killing agent applied weekly.
Sealing them shut with bathroom silicon sealer can reduce the draught to merely arctic proportions. Fitting secondary glazing (AKA Clingfilm) can reduce your heating and bleach bills to merely astronomic levels.    
I read recently of some demented nitwit actually having some of these devices, second only to the Saniflo in terms of sheer horror, declared to be listed items in a building.
Injecting them frequently with Sulphuric acid through the small holes used during plating ensures their rapid demise and replacement with something more befitting of the name "window" (not that I would know you understand - merely something I heard somewhere).
--
Peter Parry.
http://www.wpp.ltd.uk/
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| Hi, we moved into a flat approx 4 months ago, I didn't take much notice of | the windows,although they're critall framed ones, but my main worry is with | the onset of autumn/winter, these type of windows if my memory serves me | right tend to suffer terribly from damp. My question is, before the cold | damp weather arrives is there anything that I can treat these windows with? | Unfortunately the terms of the lease state that I can't change the windows | for more modern double glazed UPVC types. Any help would be appreciated. | |
crittall have moved with the times and now produce steel windows with double glazing, thermal breaks and are permanently powder coated white!(or any other colour you may want) i am seriously considering replacing all my aging upvc windows with new crittall windows.
rpm
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Christian McArdle wrote:

What a disgraceful incitement. You don't seem to realise what a Critall window is, I don't see how you could "accidentally smash it".
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Sorry gov, I was just playing with my oxyacetalene torch when...
Christian.
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Nah, I'm not good at that. But at least my newsreader doesn't knacker up the thread! (FYI, your newsreader always puts your messages at the root of a thread, even when you've replied to a specific message).
Christian.
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Mark Fry wrote:

Stick-on draught-proofing may help keep the cold out, but they're not usu. that bad. Re. condensation, a strip of cloth laid on the cill with an "upstand" against the window wicks up moisture & dries out a lot quicker than drips/pools do. Secondary DG is a good bet. Plastic windows are short- lived, properly fited DG in aluminium, galvanised, or timber is better.
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They don't suffer from damp, but they do suffer from condensation.
The moisture that condenses on them is produced mainly by the people living in the property, so you will not eliminate it, but may be able to minimise it.
Your options are broadly to minimise the production of moisture, extract moist air, or prevent the moist air reaching the glass and frames.
There are numerous threads on condensation for you to research.
Secondary glazing may help, but will not prevent. De-humidification will not prevent it in isolation either, and you will not prevent the production of moist air.
Your best bet is to use the heating wisely - even constant temperature, rather than bursts of heat twice a day, and wipe the windows and frames twice a day too to mop up all condensate.
Just make sure the frames and cill are painted and smooth and "wipeable". Fill any gap between frame and glass with a bead of mould resitant silicone.
I grew up with these windows and mom would never let any moisture settle on the frames or cill. I saw condensation but I never saw any mould in our house. I now manage hundreds of these properties for a Local Authority, and when I suggest that the tenant should actually mop up the moisture I get a strange look ... or abuse!
BTW, leases normally allow the tenant to undertake upgrades, does yours specifically deny you this under the contract?
Changing to DG units does not prevent the condensation occuring and is no miracle cure, and can just move it to the next cold spot ie the walls, where the mould grows on wallpaper and paste, and is then even harder to control.
dg

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