Council tax bands on new homes

Sorry, this is probably not the right group, but I can't find any other. I enquired of Bryant about the council tax band on a new property. It was band F, which is quite a high band. Does this mean that the intended revaluation for all properties will already have been done for new homes being built now? The property in question was in the 120K - 160K range, to all of which the Band F will apply at that particular site in Nottinghamshire.
MM
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e_not37.fslife.co.uk> writes

I am pretty sure you are correct. The banding was done based on values at 1 April 1991, (I think), so it would not work if a property built today was "valued" at its current value.
e.g. many properties which we sold for around 40K, (the A/B band boundary in Manchester), in the early 90's are now in excess of 100,000, which would have put them in a much higher band if they were new today, and the above rule were applied.
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Richard Faulkner wrote:

I agree about Apr 1991.

Perhaps this is how things work. Perhaps this is underhand on the part of the Council valuation dept? Under the old system there was definately a tendency to for the rateable value of equivalent sized and valued homes to be higher for the more recently built ones.
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As I understand it, Band D housing is meant to be the average price (and therefore you pay 100% Council Tax - Bands C or below pay less tax and Bands E and above pay more).
Does anyone know if its National Average, or local average? I ask this because our basic, nothing special, 3 bed semi in Guildford was bought for 204k a few months ago, and is currently Band D.
When the re-valuations happen (in 2005?) it'll probably be a slightly highter price - however, currently the average house price is something like 130k. So - based on this, we could be looking at Band E or F (something like 130% Council Tax) - unless of course, they used the regional average house price - where we'd be an average propertly (or closer to it).
The problem I can see with using a National Average is that places like Surrey could end up with the majority of people paying > 100% tax - so the local government gets more money (quite possible). This makes me wonder if I have it all wrong - and the bands are calculated such that a County Council will collect 100% tax throughout the county - and the average (band D) being relative to the number of people and local property prices.
Any thoughts/corrections?
Thanks
David
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writes

Yeah - that sounds sensible - however, http://www.voa.gov.uk/council_tax/bands_england_wales.htm says that band D is 68k to 88k (no mention of regional variations), and from what I understand, Band D is 100% tax (with increases or decreases for higher/lower bands). So - how can that be reconciled with regional variations in house prices? An 'average' property in Wales may be 80k, whereas an average one in Surrey 200k. These would obviously be in different bands.
I'm still confused...
D
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Yes, and so the standard band D council tax in Surrey would be lower than it is in Wales, and the average house in either region will end up paying roughly the same council tax. So anyone with a lorra money in Granadaland tries to get a TV show in London.
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Yes, I saw the figures which cover the country last night - doesnt seem to make sense, given local variations. I am equally confused.
Perhaps that is why there is a revaluation coming?
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On Thu, 4 Sep 2003 13:25:01 +0100, Richard Faulkner

It doesn't need to be consistent across the country. Councils set *local* taxes. They know how many properties they have in each band, and the formula that relates the different proportions payable is fixed. (It's in 1/13ths of the Band D rate, I think.) So, it's easy to work out effectively how many Band D properties there are, and divide that into the amount of money they have decided to raise. That defines the Band D charge, and the rest follow.
If you had two areas, one made up exclusively of very cheap houses, and other of very expensive houses, then the fact that the Band D valuation is a fixed monetary band merely means that everyone in the two areas would pay a tax rate very close to their neighbours. (Say, all houses in the cheaper area in Bands A-D and in the expensive area E-H). This must seem fairer than a normalised system which guaranteed that each council had a enforced spread of banding, and thus that there would be some taxpayers always paying half the average and others twice it (or whatever the multipliers are), irrespective of their absolute "wealth".
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On Thu, 4 Sep 2003 13:25:01 +0100, a particular chimpanzee named
keyboard and produced:

The whole Council Tax issue was a fiasco, ill thought through and brought in in a hurry to get rid of the Poll Tax. It combines the worst of both the Poll Tax & the rates.
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