Connecting Delinghi Gas Cooker to flexible (threaded) hose connector

Can anyone help. I recently purchased a second hand Delonghi gas cooker (Don't have model name) but is not more than 3 years old.
The cooker has two connection points at the back. These are effectively an inverted L shape pipe protruding from the back. (Apparently common for European type cookers). At the botton of the pipe is a threaded (male) connector (3/4" diameter). The problem is that this connector, when not connected is free to travel up and down (to the end) of the pipe.
When I connect my flexible hose with (female) threaded connector to the male connector in the cooker, there is still travel in the cooker connector. I have tried to different size connectors, and both have same problem.
In other words the pipe, when connected and fully tightened, is still able to travel upwards about 2 to 3 cms. Obviously therefore the gas leaks.
Here are the questions:
Is there a proper connector I can get? I.e. ine with a collar in the middle so that both connection points will be sealed against the collar. If so what exactly is this called and where to buy from.
Can I use the putty type jointing compound (by Fernox I think). I do not really want to use this, because it seems like a dodgy way of doing it.
I would ask my plumber - but he's on hols at present.
Your help would be appreciated.
GAZ
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On 26 Aug 2003 07:55:47 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com (Ghazali) wrote:

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(Ghazali)

How can you conclude that?
Why does one need to know the name of the cooker to be competent for the job. If you asked a plumber to fit a gas cooker for you - do you think you would need to tell him the exact make and model of the cooker before he came round? Do you not think he would be competent enough to know how to fit a cooker - regardless of its make and model.
Oh and BTW - Thanks for all your help!!!! (But perhaps in future you could stick to answering my questions rather than making useless comments!!)
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     snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com (Ghazali) writes:

Sorry, but it was quite clear to me from your question. This means it is both illegal and dangerous for you to undertake the work.

You are picking up on the wrong point.

I think the best possible help is to advise you to get someone competent to undertake the work.
I am all for DIY, but a very important part of DIY is knowing when not to.
--
Andrew Gabriel

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On 27 Aug 2003 03:57:03 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com (Ghazali) wrote:

your good self and my comment is entirely valid IMHO.
As Clint Eastwood said (In Dirty Harry) "A man needs to know his limitations".
There is no big issue with this,I have worked in the gas industry for 25 years and have had experience of varying degrees on equipment ranging from domestic cookers to National Grid transmission systems up to 30 Bar. Still I know my limitations in the field of Gas engineering and If i dont know or am unsure,I leave it to someone else who does know. The law requires it AND it is a safe and professional way in which to conduct myself.
Back to your position. Clearly it appears that you do not have sufficient experience of identifying commonly used fittings for domestic installations. It would therefore seems prudent,in the interests of your safety and that of others,that you engage someone who is fully conversant with such matters,can demonstrate competency and complete the job safely and to the required standard.
Its not a big issue. For example, I know Jack Sh** about Bosch Mono-motronic fuel injection systems. My car has one,it has a fault(just developed this week) ,i havent a clue therefore I pass it to the expert at a suitably equipped dealership. I don;t get all upset about it,I recognise my limitations.
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tarquinlinbin wrote:

I am familiar with the type of fitting the OP has mentioned. Traditionally cookers usually have a 1/2" BSP female connection. Many modern cookers have a flanged connection witha 1/2" female back nut. The fitting on the end of a standard flexible gas hose is 1/2" BPS taper male. The taper prevents the back nut from closing the fitting even though at first sight they seem together. So the correct fitting to install the cooker is a converter from 1/2" female to 1/2" paralell male iron and a neoprene washer to seal the join.
Whilst I support competant diy if you need to ask about this sort of matter then you are not sufficiently experienced.
--
Ed Sirett - Property maintainer and registered gas fitter.
The FAQ for uk.diy is at www.diyfaq.org.uk
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