Condensing Tumble Driers

Page 1 of 2  
Has anybody any major opinions on these good or Bad ?. I currently have a vented tumble drier that is nearing the end of its life (but still usable)...I would like to get another drier and run them both until the orig one packs up (lots of kids and lots of washing !!!) I do not want to hammer another hole in the garage wall (double brick) So a Condensing Tumble drier seems ideal for the moment. I am thinking a fairly cheap one (189 ish at comet/Miller Bros). Do you think this is a good idea ? Regards
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
writes

Only you can decide that.
We have a condensing t-d. A Zanussi. It's been no trouble in the n years ( >5) that we've had it but they're less efficient and so cost more to run than the vented type and they're more complex so there's more to go wrong, but we had no choice. T-D's are hardly difficult to obtain, if your existing one has been enough so far I'd wait until it packed up and then replace it with another vented.
--
dave @ stejonda

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The heat is pumped into the house, so aids your heating in winter. Not as expensive as you think.
--
--

Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com ).
Version: 6.0.524 / Virus Database: 321 - Release Date: 07/10/2003
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I can only tell you what we have found from the previous owner of our house. We live in a 2 bed mid terrace, only 10 years old, prettty well insulated. It was occupied by a family of four, in the small kitchen there was a washing machine one and and a condesing dryer the other. When we came oto view the house it felt damp, despite it being a dry week all the windows were open etc, but the air in the house was damp. Upstairs under the eves, by the window there was mildew, only house on the estate with it, and there are similar sized families living in them the only thing we can putit down to is the dryer. Since we moved in and have not got a tumble dryer the house has been fresher and dryer. We removed the mildew and to date not a sigle sign of it returning.
I am afraid I do not know the model, but i know it was a candy machine.
HTH
Rach

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

features we started adding things to our list of requirements! The features that I think are important are: 1. Sensor that knows when enough moisture has been drawn out and stops 2. Reverse action drum. Goes one way and then the other, so clothes don't get twisted. 3. Turns drum over once every five minutes once cycle is over, so clothes don't crease. All these features because I don't "believe" in ironing. These features ensure smooth clothes.
We chose condensor as it was an extra put in the corner of our bedroom (really need to extend!), and we didn't want to plumb or vent. It can be plumbed to empty the water, but we just empty the tank every 3 loads or so. An added unexpected bonus - it puts the baby to sleep in seconds (and mummy) and adds a nice wee warm fug to the room :-) I like having it in our bedroom as clothes get put on hangers and straight into the wardrobe and there is no laundry hanging about waiting to be taken upstairs. Also I haven't ironed in 3 months. I now only buy tumble dryable clothes and as for old stuff, well, if it doesn't survive it goes in the bin!
When we renovate I intend moving both washing machine and tumble dryer upstairs permanently. It makes no sense to have dirty laundry upstairs, take it down to wash and dry, and then cart back up again. Things end up dangling on radiators sitting in piles etc. Why are they traditionally in kitchens or utility rooms downstairs? Very illogical. I intend to streamline the whole process: into basket, into machine, into dryer, on hanger, into wardrobe. Downstairs will be laundry free! No ironing, no piles. I would recommend an expensive model if you don't intend to iron, and a cheaper one if you do. The more sensitive dearer models leave just a tiny bit of moisture behind so clothes do not wrinkle.
It adds 200 a year to our electicity bill. No ironing? Family of five? Well worth every penny! I HATE ironing.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Suz wrote:

folding doors in the upstairs hall, near the main bedroom, and right next to the linen cupboard. Very sensible arrangement.
Sheila
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The Scandinavians think the same way. They have the laundry in the bathroom, or in a separate room upstairs.
--
--

Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com ).
Version: 6.0.524 / Virus Database: 321 - Release Date: 07/10/2003
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Is this really true - no ironing? mens shirts, T shirts??
I spen about 10 - 15 a week on having stuff ironed, (and it's worth evry penny <g>), travelling to and from the shop twice aswell.
If I could be sure a tumble dryer could do what you say, I would have one!!
What make and model? How much ? Can you get a washer dryer with these features?
This could be a dream come true - a bit like a dishwasher <g>
--
Richard Faulkner

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
writes

Yes it works for me, really and truly.
The first thing that made me consider dumping ironing was when I discovered my MIL never ironed. She had five kids and always looks pristine. She removed a wash immediately and tugged the clothes straight immediately and put them on a radiator. She then hung them when they were 95% dry. I was entirely amazed -they are all neat and flat.
The trick is to take the wash out immediately and tumble it. Again hang as soon as the tumble dryer stops for best results. At this point they have tiny creases and look like they need a wee iron, but don't shove into the wardrobe immediately, but give them five mintes in the air 1st. When you take them out of the wardrobe you can't tell them apart from from ironed stuff. I started this out of necessity as I was so busy with 3 wee kids. Now it just seems daft to iron at all.
You can't get a crease down the arm of a shirt/ trousers if you are that kind of stuffy person tho. And Marks and Sparks Italian shirts come out crumpled. Hubby has 2. I shoved them in the wardrobe and refused to iron them. He ignores them and thay have been left there. Low iron or no iron shirts work best. Avoid any clothes that need ironed at two dots or 3 dots on the iron symbol, or one that needs ironed while damp. Some of these do come out OK, but most are unlikely too. The same goes for things that are non-tumble dryable. Although its the 1st thing I look at when buying, we do have some. I toss them all in, saves time not having to sort into can and can't tumble piles, and if they die, they die. They didn't deserve to live if they want ironed. I'm heartless like that... So far no casualties tho.
Another thing is the fabric conditioner. You need to use it. I only use Comfort. I have used standard, Easy-iron and the new Quick dry and there is a difference. From an ironing point of view, Easy Iron has the best results. But the clothes feel a tiny bit slimy coming out of the wash and sometimes they need 2 goes of the tumble dryer - they are slow to dry. Quick Dry does indeed dry quickern (a lot quicker) which saves on electricity, but you get a slightly less flat appearance. Still acceptable for most clothes though. Ordinary comfort is in between. You definitely need some fabric conditioner though, so if you are allergic this is not for you.
Our tumble is a Hotpoint TDC60 and it cost 329, after shopping around on the internet. Can't remember which one we got from in the end, maybe appliancedirect?
A washer dryer will consume more electricty as it has to dry itself. Not good for a busy family - A wash and dry cycle takes about 2 hours. At 3 washes a day for us, it just wouldn't work. For a bloke on his own it would be great. Stick it on the morning and it's all down when you come home. The "keep turning after drying complete" option would be vital in this case to avoid ironing.
Must go. Tumble dryer just finished it's cycle. :o)
hth Suzanne
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Sounds like the business - I'm off to have a look!
--
Richard Faulkner

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
writes

Does this tumble and use Comfort only work on condensing dryers?
--
--

Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com ).
Version: 6.0.524 / Virus Database: 321 - Release Date: 06/10/2003
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

only reason we got one is its location - shoved in the corner of the room as a temporary measure (but I reckon it'll be permenant). We could be bothered putting in a drain or vent.
But again the extra features like moisture sensor to stop, and keep turning after cycle complete would be necessary for best results if you wish to avoid ironing. The extra cost would be recouped easily if you compared it to a years electricity consumption of an iron or the cost of an ironing service. My mother's is the cheapest, timer only job. It absolutely toasts the clothes and although they come out really dry they look a bit crumply. I thought ours wasn't very efficient at first, but now I realise that tiny bit of moisture left allows the last wrinkles to drop when clothes are removed from dryer.
The lulling sound of the dryer is an great unexpected bonus. I'm sitting on the bed with the laptop now, and hubby is snoozing off one of his migraines and baby is SNORING in his cot. The soft sound is very relaxing. Reminds me of a kid in the farmhouse when all was quiet and the kettle was singing on the Rayburn Royal. My point being: I think the bedroom is a brilliant location for a dryer.
hth Suzanne
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Suzanne,
I'm getting into this now, and am wondering if you researched washer dryers with these functions? If it truly works, I can add in around 400 per year in ironing service costs, on top of the cost of a normal washer dryer of about 325.
I've been to the usual suspects, Comet, Currys, Powerhouse (New), and cant find one, or cant find anything which suggests it has the sensor and keep turning facility.
I wonder if they dont make them yet?
Regds
--
Richard Faulkner

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
writes

I think Suz means that a keep turning facility is that the drum turns for about 10 mins after the heater element goes off. Auto detect if dry is common.
--
--

Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com ).
Version: 6.0.524 / Virus Database: 321 - Release Date: 06/10/2003
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
writes

Not really. The drum turns once every five minutes so clothes don't settle into creases. It will go for days. Once the door is opened the cycle is truly ended and when shut again doesn't turn any more. My mother's cheapie turns off the heat and blows cold air for 10 mins at the end to "set" the clothes. But then that's it stopped for ever. So if you're out, forgotten about it, etc, wrinkles start to set in.
We didn't look at washer dryers at all because we already had a good washing machine, and doing 3 washes a day means we need a quick turnaround time.
I'll do a quick surf and see if I can spot anything with similar functions to ours.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Which's 2002 report on dryers - nothing on washer dryers -------------------- Tumble Driers, Buying Guide There are few differences in how quickly tumble driers dry loads, regardless of price or brand. However, there are big differences in how well designed they are for everyday use. So our Best Buy is a cheap, easy to use, sensor drier. Is it a condenser or air-vented drier? The biggest headache with tumble driers is venting them. Condenser driers condense the hot, damp air produced while drying into the water that collects in a built-in tray. This means that they can be placed anywhere around the house, whereas air-vented driers must be near a window or door for ventilation - if they're not, you'll have to fit a vent through a wall. Should I consider a gas drier? Running costs for gas models (made by White Knight) are around three times cheaper per load than electric ones. You will need to pay an upfront fee of around 50 for installation, and also have regular check-ups by a Corgi-registered gas fitter. Will it fit the space available? If space is tight, you could consider a compact model. These typically hold around 3kg of laundry, instead of the 5 or 6kg you can fit in a full-sized one. They're usually around 18cm shorter and 10cm smaller in width and depth, but they tend to take longer and cost relatively more per load than full-sized ones. How easy is it to use? Tumble driers are fairly simple appliances, but some dry automatically (sensor models), and some use a manual timer. Both are straight-forward to use, but it's worth being able to override the sensor to give laundry an extra ten-minute burst. Check the door, filter and water tray aren't awkward to use. Water trays can be awkward to remove and replace - and you may need to empty the tray after every load. Can it be used with a timer? If you live in an area where you can take advantage of cheap-rate electricity, and don't mind using your drier at night, then a built-in timer makes doing this a doddle. If a model doesn't have one, check that it can be used with a plug-in timer switch, as models with a 'start' button may prevent you from doing this. Reliable brands Crusader, Creda Jackson
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The problem with washer dryers is that the majority of them use cold water from the mains to add condensing. This results in the water consumption being similar to that of a fully open fire hydrant. This is bad if you have a meter and bad for the environment anyhow.
Christian.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

One reason they are often installed downstairs is that they frequently leak, which would bring down the ceiling. If you intend to put a washer in upstairs, make some sort of arrangement to collect any leaked water before it damages anything. Some sort of wet floor or collection tray arrangement plumbed to an overflow through the wall would be good.
Christian.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Christian McArdle wrote:

I wonder why I've never seen something similar for the tanks/cisterns in lofts?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Something to do with the fact that WASHING LINES (yes, they do exist) tend to be outdoors so if you do happen to want to save the money (and all that electricity) you have to lug the clothes downstairs at some point in order to take them outside to dry, and (I'd contend) it is much easier to do this while they are dry - before washing - than wet.
Also, it is possible to minimise ironing by hanging clothes on the line correctly and while they are still damp enough to have enough weight to pull out the creases left by the washing process. Doesn't eliminate it, of course, and isn't perfect for those who desire perfection. This is why my wife does the ironing :-) I much perfer the "feel" of wind-dried clothes, and there aren't really *that* many (consecutive) days when drying outside is completely impossible, even in the uk, though it does help if there's someone at home during the day in order to take advantage of dry spells.
On a slightly different tangent, if you can afford the extra outlay and have the facilities I'm told a gas tumble dryer is a *lot* less expensive to run.
Hwyl!
M.
--
Martin Angove: http://www.tridwr.demon.co.uk /
Don't fight technology, live with it: http://www.livtech.co.uk /
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.