Combination Boiler Flue

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And the flue cavity is not being used by another appliance or an open fire!
Christian.
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fire!
Especially if your boiler's flue has a plastic outer pipe!
-- John Stumbles -+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-|-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+ -+ Thank God I'm an atheist
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I'm interested in this comment - my ancient cast iron boiler is flued through the chimney in the middle of the house - with the terminal standing about 200mm above the top of the chimney (rough guess - I haven't been onto the roof to measure it). We often use the open fire during the winter - is this something I should be worried about?
Also, I'm planning to replace the boiler in the next year or two, and had imagined that we'd retain the same flueing arrangement (although with a new flue)- is this going to be a problem?
Regards
Neil
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On 24 Dec 2003 00:44:05 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@the-joneses.org.uk (Neil Jones) wrote:

It may be that the chimney stack is constructed with several flues - this is typical in older properties - for example to connect from the separate rooms upstairs and down.
Normally a conventional flue, where passed through a chimney stack is hooked up using a flue liner (flexible metal tube) all the way to the top. As long as this is passing through a separate flue way to that from the open fire, then it's fine. Presumably the smoke from the fire exits via a different pot, in which case it will be separate.
.andy
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Hmm. Could be, I suppose. I'll have to check. But somehow I doubt it - the fireplace is a 2m wide inglenookleading to a pretty large chimney without any pots on. When we queried adding pots to stop rain coming down the chimney (which isn't actually that much of a problem, it turns out) our chimney sweep explained that we'd have to reduce the opening and use a smaller fire basket, etc.

The boiler's flue is a large-ish (150mm, say) steel pipe which disappears into the chimney. I have no idea what connects it to the terminal but I had assumed it was the same, rigid pipe all the way.
I can see I need to look into this rather more seriously. AFAIK the boiler was installed in 1989 - have the requirements changed since then?
Presumably the smoke from the

As I mentioned before, no pots. I think I may need to have a good look up (or down) the chimney

Many thanks
Neil
PS I realise that this won't thread properly, but google groups is v. slow to update and I expect to be on my way through the door shortly. Merry Christmas.
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