cistern overflow

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Richard wrote

Thanks, but obviously not everybody could see it. Not knowing anything about this I guess it's got something to do with ISP's, but is it mine or theirs? Should I contact mine? I need some help on this.

This is copied from Southern Water's web site, quoting the Regs:
"Water Supply (Water Fittings) Regulations 1999 WC Warning Pipes Except for pressure flushing cisterns, all WC flushing cisterns should be provided with a connection for a warning pipe, the outlet of which is to discharge in a prominent position, or other equally effective device. The Water Supply Industry considers modern, tested and approved ball valves are sufficiently reliable and that WCs that have an internal overflow discharging into the WC pan shall be deemed to meet the requirement of the Regulations. A warning pipe may also discharge into a flush pipe, without a tundish."
I agree it's surprising - you'd expect tons of cases of people ignoring water flowing into the WC pan (even if they do notice it). But then tons of people ignore external warning pipes anyway. It's a brave move and makes things a lot easier for all of us. Maybe they'll review it later and change the Regs again if necessary.

You might think so - I could'nt possibly comment! ;o)
Peter
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the toilet. Therefore you will keep hearing the toilet flush!
--
-- Bill

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Ghostly flushings!!!!!
Not necessarily - take a look at the workings of the push button type of cistern. There is no siphon - just a buoyant bung that is lifted to flush the toilet. When the cistern empties the bung reseats itself over the outlet and is held by the weight of water until it is next lifted. The overflow is down the central guide. http://www.fluidmaster.com/intl.html
--


Regards

John


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writes

It would need a catastrophic failure of the inlet valve for the hydraulic siphon to complete on it's own and even then I doubt it. You may be referring to the self flushing cisterns that have been fitted to some public urinals these however are of different design and are purpose made to self flush. Incidentally IMHO these should be banned because of the vast quantities of water that they waste. That is of course if they have not already been condemned in view of the water shortages that many parts of the UK will soon be suffering from. Richard.
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True, the only instance that I have had so far of mine working was when my ball fell off, pretty catastrophic! Don't ask why. Having just tested it with a slight dribble then no it doesn't syphon.

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"-" wrote | >It would need a catastrophic failure of the inlet valve for the | >hydraulic siphon to complete on it's own and even then I doubt it. | True, the only instance that I have had so far of mine working was | when my ball fell off, pretty catastrophic!
'Its' ball surely? Otherwise it certainly would be catastrophic.
Owain
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On Mon, 29 Dec 2003 10:59:14 +0000 (UTC), "Richard"

Many are already fitted with some sort of "Cistermiser" device which ensures they only flush when used. Some are electric and use a PIR, others detect the drop in water supply pressure when taps in the toilet are used. Caution is neccessary- you don't want to see the results for the drainage pipework of inadequate flushing.
--
Niall

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On Sun, 28 Dec 2003 09:16:38 -0000, "Peter Taylor"

Yet again this newsgroup scores a major victory! I'm fitting a new close-coupled pan and cistern in the new year and was faced with running the overflow pipe right across the bathroom to the bath waste pipe - about a 4 ft pipe run.
Now all I need do is ensure I've got one of these internal overflow jobbies and the jobs done.
Excellent. Please pat yourself on the back for sharing a superbly useful piece of information.
PoP
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PoP wrote

Thanks. I'm glad you finally saw it! Could you kindly have a look on the Mixer Tap Help thread and see if you can see my post there? Nobody has answered that one either! :o)
All the best Peter
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On Sun, 28 Dec 2003 12:40:23 -0000, "Peter Taylor"

Hmm, I have hundreds of messages in my newsreader window so picking this one out isn't going to be easy. However I'll keep my eyes peeled..... :)
PoP
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I don't really agree with these internal overflows. I suppose people will soon be asking how to fix limescale stains from a constantly running overflow into the toilet bowl.
Overflows should be treated as indications that a minor D-I-Y job is needed.
Replacing a ball valve washer is a 10 minute job - better still replace the ball valve for something more sophisticated. I suppose that once a washer starts to allow a leak it becomes quickly eroded and rapidly deteriorates.
A running overflow is an indication that something needs a bit of attention.
--


Regards

John


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On Sun, 28 Dec 2003 22:54:45 -0000, "John"

I think it's a good move actually.
The historical way of arranging an overflow was to run a pipe thru an external wall so that the overflow drips water outside. All well and good, but there could be some foliage out there, or it could potentially get blocked (if it is really cold weather then the overflow pipe could ice up).
The time saved in piping the overflow is not insignificant either, if you have to add things like pipe clips etc.
PoP
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I would be surprised if there wasn't already an overflow fitted inside the cistern. I've just been looking for a new toilet myself and all the close coupled cisterns had a little pipe fitted inside which was preset to the maximum water level and drained into the water catchment area where the cistern mounts the pan.
The Q
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