Caustic Soda

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Andy Dingley wrote:

I have some of that Oxygen based cleaning powder. Vanish Oxy Action is one brand, but not the brand I have.
On both tubs they say you shouldn't store it once you mix with water, as it will continue to produce oxygen.
Ok I ask, why not? What's wrong with it continuing to produce oxygen?!
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wrote:

It'll burst a sealed container.
If the action relies on it producing oxygen, then having this useful reaction go on in storage will mean that it'll have run out of steam by the time you come to use it.
-- Die Gotterspammerung - Junkmail of the Gods
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What it's probably producing is single oxygen atoms, which are highly reactive. What you have is an unstable compound which releases oxygen. Similar to hydrogen peroxide and sodium hypochlorite.
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I just bought some toffee apples covered deliquescent toffee from Sainsbury's. Less than 24 hrs later it has absorbed so much water from the air/apples that it has dissolved in it. Grrrr...
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Also you add the solid hydroxide to water, slowly. Doing it the other way around means you are likely to wind up with a combination of boiling saturated solution and steam.
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Terry D wrote:

Oh well. I use it on crystal form, and break all the rules, except the one that says never get it on your eyes.
In my 6th form chemisty class teh not-very-bright boy of the class
managed to suck a cc or so into his mouth using a pipette.
Washed out with gallons of water.
I regularly get it on my skin. It turns the skin into soap. Wash with lots of cold water.
It rots jeans very quickly.
I have even poouyred boilig water on it to get a really superheated hot solution for drain blocakges. Yes, it boils fiercely and splashes boiling hot concentrated alkali everywhere. No, it hasn't killed me yet. I'd rather handle that stuff than a router or planer franjkly - come far nearer serious accidents.
Application of it is tricky. You need a brush that won't be attacked. Most will be. Any drips will wreck whatever they fall on. sso its nopt an ideal solution (haha) for paint stripping - you are probably better of with nitromors and a (electric?) toothbrush. That's not so good on skin either, and a nono for eyes - wear glasses at least.
Caustic is fearsome stuff, but its not instant death the way a chainsaw can be. The antidote is gallons of cold water INSTANTLY on anything that gets splashed, and a very weak acid like vinegar *afterwards* can get the Ph balanced.
I don't think its right for your application, but I think the respondee here is being over cautious.

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New coving sounds simpler
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wrote:

Just keep a bucket of water nearby if you're at all worried.
MJ
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On Sun, 26 Oct 2003 18:45:23 -0000, "Terry D"

Mix it with yeast and hydrochloric acid and you can make Marmite....
(ever wondered why it tasted so salty ?)
I think NaOH is just about the second-safest caustic chemical I have in the workshop. Everything else is _much_ worse.
-- Die Gotterspammerung - Junkmail of the Gods
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I remember a lab technician who preferred not to wear gloves when dealing with the nasty chemicals in a semiconductor lab (stuff much worse than caustic soda). His logic was that with latex gloves, a pinhole or tear could go un-noticed, and you could have nasty stuff (like HF) on your hands for a long time before you notice (hands invariably get sweaty in the gloves anyway, so dampness not a clue), whereas without gloves any splashes would be noticed and remedied immediately. Seemed to make sense.....
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You might try mixing the solution -once you obtain it, into some lime. The paste should be easier to handle at least. I imagine caustic would be no kinder to flour than it is to skin and brushes.
Have you tried a mild acid such as vinegar on the filler. If it lime based that should ruin it shouldn't it? No idea about that though. Nor what to use to make a paste of it.
Keep us posted
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Hi.
It is normal with stripped wood to have little bits of paint and filler left in place. I would either let them be, or else carefully paint over them with a wood matching colour before varnishing etc.
Or if youre really determined, use a powered rotary wire brush, but it will leave a wood surface that I dont know how to describe: it rips out the soft pith but leaves the hard fibres, so you get a finely ridged finish.
Regards, NT
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Or if you want to be more adventurous, paint the filler bits red, black, or etc.
Regards, NT
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Michael Mcneil wrote in message

make alkaline paint strippers.
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Always add the dry pellets to water, never the other way around. Stir continuously mix in a stainless steel or plastic container and use a wooden spoon or a stainless one.
Do not ever mix caustic + aluminium or leave a caustic soda solution in a plastic bottle for storage. Even plastic mixing vessels will, eventually, crumble into dust, so stainless is best.
Other than that, read the label, wear gloves and eye protection, don't be a prat.
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Steve Firth wrote:

Unless you are prepared for an exciting reaction that generates very concentrated hot alkali. And a lot of presure. Ideal for poipe clearance.

Nah., Its biring that way round.

Glass is OK, unless it cracks. Stir with anything, but be aware what you start stirring with may not last the course, including your finger. :-)

Indeed. Once you hace cleaned your plastic drain, flush properly with a little vinegar. I used to cklean my horrid tea stained plastic sink with caustic crsytals and boiling water poured on. Got rid if the teastains, and quite a few pairs of jeans, Plastic did degrade, but it was on its last legs anyway.

Definietlty watch out for eyes. Disagree about gloves: If it gets inside you will be seriously burnt before you can get the buggers off, but a splash on the hand is no worse if rapidly washed than a splash of hot water - and not NEARLY as bad as a splash of hot fat.
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Would that be the same as stuff my mum used years (decades) ago? It was in a crappy wobbly cardboard box, half red and half white and said Soda Crystals on the outside? We weren't allowed to touch it, she had a special spoon reserved for digging bits out of it. She put a couple of spoonfuls in her mop bucket to take really stubborn stains off the very ancient kitchen tiles. It always brought them up like new.
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On Tue, 28 Oct 2003 23:40:27 -0000, "Suz"

No, that would have been washing soda - sodium carbonate.
Sodium bicarbonate is baking soda. Sodium hydroxide is caustic soda.
Sodium carbonate is hygroscopic, not deliquescent (like caustic). so you can store it in a cardboard box and it will go crappy and wobbly. Store caustic like that and you'll have a corrosive puddle before long. It's also a salt commonly found in dry "salt lakes". The ancient Egyptians knew it as "natron" and because it absorbs water, they packed dead bodies in it to dry them out for mummification.
I use washing soda for shifting grease (it saponifies fats by turning them into a crude soap), and I can do this in the kitchen sink while my hands are still in there. I lose some oil from my skin, but a little hand cream deals with that. I also use it to make tapwater conductive in my electrolytic derusting tank (DAGS)
-- Die Gotterspammerung - Junkmail of the Gods
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Steve Firth wrote in message <1g3hnij.3oj5t91o2kmnhN%%steve%>

or varnishes.
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