CAT5 wall socket - AAARRRGH!

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Hi,
just trying to install my first CAT5 wall socket.
I worked out how to do patch leads some time ago, using the very useful diagrams in the Black Box catalogue, but I have not been able to find any diagrams for sockets. Googled myself to death, still nothing.
BB shows the pin numbering, but there is no map of where these match to connectors on the back.
Having taken a socket apart and probed it with my trusty analogue multimeter I now have a diagram of where the pairs go, and just have to punch down the connections with an IDC punch tool. [I have a disgusting cheapo plastic one.]
Looking at it logically, I position the wire at right angles to the slot, and the punch tool then pushes the wire down into the slot, where it crimps. Good tools also cut the wire - this one doesn't look as though it will, being all plastic. Presumably I then trim wire end with snips.
Just want to check that this is the way to do it as it feels un-natural to position the wires at right angles to the slots. My first instinct with wires is to spread them out and feed them through the slots, but then they would impede the punch tool. Or would it? Looking again there is a slot in the base of the tool so perhaps you do feed the wires through.
So how do you do it?
Also, once the wires are in, how easy are they to get out again?
I don't really want to use up my sockets learning how to use a punch tool.
TIA Dave R
--




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chop of ends after with side cutters.
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<snip>

Thanks - but which way do I feed the wires in before punching down?
The punch tool only seems to fit one way, with the 'heel' in the central gap between the two rows of contacts, but if there are wires running up this central gap then the 'heel' will foul on them.
Do they feed in from the outside, or along the top then down?
TIA Dave R
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Every Cat 5 (Cat 3 & Cat 4) socket I have terminated has the wire down the centre and the 'fanned out' to the relevant IDC contact. What manufacturer are they from? Usually the pin numbers are marked against the corresponding IDC contact.
HTH
John
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So long since I bought them I can't remember where.
No manufacturere name obvious - just 'EC Made'. One side of the socket says MOD-TAP The other side says KATT-RJLP and has S348B CAT5E* printed on it.
The slots are not numbered (hence the strip and check with meter) just have red, green, blue and brown colour blocks. I am still not 100% happy about the numbering - this is what I currently think it is.
Looking from the back:
7 - White/brown 1 - white/orange [red splodge] [brown splodge] 8 - Brown/white 2 - orange/white [ ] [ ] 3 - White/green 5 - white/blue [Green splodge] [Blue splodge] 6 - Green/white 4 - blue/white
The pin settings are from checking with the meter. The colour allocations are from the 568B wiring scheme as shown in the Black Box catalogue. My concern here is that the blue and green splodges match the wiring colours, but brown and red(for orange?) seem to be switched over.
My concern over the 'wire down the middle' is that it would seem to conflict with the fit of this punch down tool, but perhaps there is tolerance for wires underneath it. Certainly wires down the centre seems the logical way to go.
Cheers Dave R
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"David W.E. Roberts" wrote | The other side says KATT-RJLP and has S348B CAT5E* printed on it.
Your cheapy plastic tool isn't a telephone socket one is it? Phone sockets use Krone connectors and, whilst you can get Cat5 sockets with Krone connectors, the above part number suggests your Cat5 socket is using Katt connectors. They're different, although some (proper) tools will do both.
Owain
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Mod-Tap is the manufacturer, part of the Molex Group, http://www.molexpn.co.uk/index.html .
Been in the industry of cabling for many a year. KATT is the 'bastardised' connection favoured by Mod-Tap. It is supposed to be a 'mixture' of Krone and AT&T, hence KATT. AT&T is no more in the cabling arena it became Lucent Technologies and is now Avaya.
A standard BT tool either plastic or the 2A type is for use on Krone IDC's and will work on KATT connectors. Although they are not that good after a few insertions, they are after all only for doing one extension socket that you buy as a kit.
David the wiring of 568B is as follows:
Pin 1 White with orange ring (or splodge) Pin 2 Orange with White ring Pin 3 White with Green ring Pin 4 Blue with White ring Pin 5 White with Blue ring Pin 6 Green with White ring Pin 7 White with Brown ring Pin 8 Brown with White ring
(Which I think is what you are saying in your posting)
Hope that helps a little
John
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<snip>

Just re-checked and re-checked, cursed, cried, checked again, despaired, checked etc. Now pretty certain it is
2 - orange/white 8 - brown/white red blob brown blob 1 - white/orange 7 - white/brown
6 - green/white 4 - blue/white green blob blue blob 3 - white/green 5 - white/blue
At least the colour blobs match the wiring colours. /white above white/ below
The problems I had were due to the rotation of the components as I took everything apart to test the (well hidden) contacts with a meter.
Also doesn't match the layout of the modular sockets I bought from Screwfix.
However everything is marked up now so hopefully all will be well.
Just have to hope the slight variant on the wire grips work O.K. with my Screwfix punchdown tool.
Cheers Dave R
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thats why these type of connectors are called IDC- Insultation Displacing Conductors!!!
Tim..
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Or connectors, even!
Christian.
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Roger
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Ooops, insultation.... LOL!
Tim..
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SLOT +--+ | | |\/| WIRE ************* |/\| ^ | | | cut here +--+
The blade of the insertion tool is parallel with the wire, not the slot.

Not easy, but possible with pliers.
I have the proper tool with cutter, but the cutter is useless as it needs so much pressure to operate that it would damage the terminals.
Christian.
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When you say 'slot' do you mean the gap down the middle between the two rows of terminals, or the slot into which the individual wire fits?
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David W.E. Roberts wrote:

The slot into which the wire fits.
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Ah - just looked at the picture again and rotated my view through 90 degrees and it all makes sense (I think). Just got my Screwfix punch tool and a double socket kit which includes a very nice explanation and picture. This job seems fated. Parcelforce (who are usually excellent) lost all record of the original shipment. After a day and a half of me chasing Screwfix they decided it was lost without trace and sent me another package. Both packages turned up this morning on the same van. Hey, ho - a wiring I will go.
Cheers Dave R
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Are the connectors anything like those in normal phone sockets? [See http://www.wppltd.demon.co.uk/WPP/Wiring/UK_telephone/uk_telephone.html ]
If so, the wires all go from the centre OUTWARDS, and are trimmed on the outside after insertion.
I would SERIOUSLY not use a cheap plastic insertion tool - at best they only do a few connections before failing - and then not very reliably. You can get a proper metal tool from the likes of Screwfix (No. D17402) for under 8.
Roger
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Thanks - they are much like that, and I am concerned about the flimsy tool.
Also now a little concerned about the quality of the sockets.
The only downside of the Screwfix tool is that it really costs 13.94 unless I add loads of other things to the order to get 'free' postage.
I only need to do a couple of sockets (so far) but even so the proper tool sounds like a good idea.
Nearly there now - here is a picture of the socket in all its nastiness.
http://www.chelsworth-lodge.nildram.co.uk/CAT5E_socket/DSC00120.JPG
From discussions so far, the cable would be fed in from the top of the picture, and individual strands fed out through the slots.
One last problem - the loop for the cable tie is at the bottom of the picture, below the contacts.
Does this mean I feed the cable up from the bottom of the picture, or do I feed it in from the top then loop it over itself to secure it?
Afraid I am having a very bad day at working things out :-(
Cheers Dave R
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Whatever rocks your boat. Just remember to keep the twist right up to the terminals. Don't be tempted to unwind the pairs to make it easier. I must say, the picture isn't clear which side the stripy or solid conductors go.
Christian.
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On Tue, 11 Nov 2003 15:44:00 -0000, Christian McArdle wrote:

Is the wiring really that sensitive? The network cabling in our office actually consists of the old serial cable we used to use for dumb terminals, with the sockets changed for RJ45s. This works fine for us. It was a case of try it to see if it works before spending money and much disruption by rewiring. Network is running at 100Mbps, doubt it would stand up to gigabit...
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