Buying a Router

Page 1 of 2  
I'm looking to buy a router, but not sure what to go for. The project I need the tool for is building 4 speaker cabinets out of 18/25mm MDF. I was looking at the B&Q Performance Power Pro 1/2" CLM2050R Router 2050W
http://www.diy.com/bq/product/product.jhtml?PRODID 0655&CATID9246
It's just under 100. It's a tool that I'll use occasionally so I don't really need the likes of makita at nearer 200.
Does anyone have any experience of this model? It seems to be pretty well put together, not as nice as the Makita, but it does not feel cheap and nasty. Should I be looking at other makes? (Screwfix Ebauer for the same sort of price, but with no cutters)
Cheers
Neil
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Just an aside... I take it that you understand the technical requirements of loudspeaker enclosures, resonant frequencies etc?
--
AJL Electronics (G6FGO) Ltd : Satellite and TV aerial systems
http://www.classicmicrocars.co.uk : http://www.ajlelectronics.co.uk
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Are they Job Public's requirements or just audiophiles requirements?
D
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Joe Public wouldn't bother making speakers - you can buy them ready made cheaper.
--
*Can vegetarians eat animal crackers?

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@argonet.co.uk London SW 12
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Possibly Joe Public may want to make speaker cabinets to fit in with furniture etc? I'd have expected an audiophile to have known how/what to do when making speakers if they wanted to make something special.
D
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 16 Dec 2003 20:10:48 -0000, "David Hearn"

No really, do get a book, otherwise there is a very high probability you will come a cropper and the whole thing will sound really dire.
e.g. (Amazon.com product link shortened)71607057/sr=1-4/ref=sr_1_2_4/026-4748531-9846830
obviously expensive, but i only did 1 search in amazon, also try the local library.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
David Hearn wrote:

Audiphiles select their furniture to match their speakers. They don't build speakers.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

True audiophiles don't give a toss what the speakers look like. And don't know what furniture is. ;-)
--
*Real women don't have hot flashes, they have power surges.

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@argonet.co.uk London SW 12
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
The Natural Philosopher wrote:

Surely Audiphiles "fiddle" with German cars?
--
http://gymratz.co.uk
The Worlds No1 Fitness & Gym Equipment/nutrition specialists.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Pet wrote:

I think you must be right.
Sick, isn't it?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Joe Public's. If the enclosure is wrong, it will sound worse than the cheapest and nastiest commercial ones.
--
AJL Electronics (G6FGO) Ltd : Satellite and TV aerial systems
http://www.classicmicrocars.co.uk : http://www.ajlelectronics.co.uk
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Andy Luckman (AJL Electronics) wrote:

Its very hard to get it THAT wrong. Snce cheap and nasty comercial enclusres are basically little more than cardboard boxes, sometimes with a hole in..
Anything buigger and more solid will sound better. There is little mystery to it all. The trick is to suppress back radiation from te units. This is easy at high frequencies, harder at low. As a compromose between gian encluosres and prcaticality, it is conventional to flip the read radioatio and delay it via a tined pipe by half a wavelength at around teh lowest frequency the bass unit can muster. This then gives a minor resonant peak - that can be adusted by varying teh vent diomensions and teh internal wadding in the speaker - that gives about half an octave more bass resposne typically.
And that Is ALL there is to it. All teh super bullshit designs are ways to do this in varyng dgerees. However the best way is to get a big enclusre and a decent driver. Full stop.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 16 Dec 2003 12:48:39 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@leeds.ac.uk wrote:

This one came up a few months ago and ISTR that someone had bought one and needed to take it back because the speed control didn't work properly.
I wouldn't be influenced by whether cutters are included in the package because they are always at the poor end of the quality range. You would be better off buying a lower end router and some decent cutters like CMT or Freud for it.
If you are only going to buy one router, then I would go for a 1/2" one as you have thought, but practice a bit first because they are heavier.
I did see one of Axminster's 99 own brand routers being demonstrated at their recent tool show and that seemed to be doing a respectable job. I didn't have an opprtunity to use it though....

.andy
To email, substitute .nospam with .gl
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
It looks like quite a good one for what you want to use it for but before you buy go and have a look at it and make sure that it has a on button that can be pushed into a permanent on, I have a Bosch router which is enough for what I use it for but whilst being on site have used other makes but the on button only works whilst it is depressed which can make operating the machine ackward and possibly dangerous. good luck and happy woodworking.
-- Yours Jason
snipped-for-privacy@btinternet.com
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The problem is that it effectively removes one of your hands, as it is wasted by keeping the machine on, a task that a latching switch could do quite adequetely, giving you the safety benefit of being able to control the machine better.
Christian.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 17 Dec 2003 17:32:32 -0000, "Christian McArdle"

I agree. Safety switch design is not always helpful especially if it makes the tool more difficult to use because the user needs 3 hands to operate it properly.
It's the same mentality that makes saws with long arbors difficult to buy in case someone uses a stacked dado set on them.
Same story Legislation for its own sake Focus on the wrong thing.
.andy
To email, substitute .nospam with .gl
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 16 Dec 2003 12:48:39 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@leeds.ac.uk wrote:

That router is a pile of shite. I bought one thinking it was a 2050 Watt router. It certainly wasn't. Performance wise I'd have said maybe equivalent to 800W.
I did one kitchen worktop with it. It struggled taking more than a couple of mm out of the worktop. The vertical lock was absolute crap - it did not hold the router at the locked depth at all - as you moved along the workpiece it gradually dragged down into the work.
An awful piece of shite - one of the worst tool purchases I ever made. I took it back to B&Q and bought a Trend T9 instead. Now that's what I call a mans router :)
PoP
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I spent ages trying to decide whether or not to buy a Power Pro router to do my kitchen worktop. In the end I hired an Hitachi. Your post make me glad of that decision.
Michael Chare
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 16 Dec 2003 18:47:59 +0000 (UTC), "Michael Chare"

I made an error of judgement with that Power Pro router. It may possibly consume 2050 watts of power - I couldn't say. But for sure it does not produce that level of power at the business end. As I said previously, 800 watts maybe.
Having said that, I have bought other Power Pro tools from B&Q and been happy with them. I recently bought a fairly substantial Power Pro router table which I'm happy with for example. But that router sucks big time.
PoP
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

.. and for a router table something powerful is generally needed.
AIUI, the Trend products are made in the same (Italian I believe) factory that produces the DeWalt and CMT products.
The appearance is very similar and items like collets and other accessories interchangeable.

.andy
To email, substitute .nospam with .gl
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.