Building an internal wall - brick or stud?

I need to build an internal wall (non load bearing) in a basement room to create a bathroom area. This will be between two parallel walls and will be approx 2-3m in length by 3m height. In the middle I will need to position a doorway into the new bathroom area.
What I need to find out is the most cost/time effective way of building the wall. An influencing factor is that I already have enough bricks in the basement to build the wall. Only problem is my brick laying skills aren`t exactly top dollar. I could do it but it would take me ages and the wall would probably end up being wonky. I would need a fair amount of mortar if I went this route but presumably it would be far cheeper that building a stud frame & then insulate/plasterboard/plaster? The positive side with a stud frame/plasterboard is that it could probably be built quick..
thoughts? TIA Steve
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be
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Stud, with insulation/soundproofing and Fermacell pre-finished drylining. No wet skills at all. http://www.fermacell.co.uk
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But building a stud partition is very quick and almost free by most DIY standards. You'll need about 10 3m lengths of 75x50 and 6 sheets of plasterboard. You'll also need some nails. That lot will be about 50 quid. The expensive bit is doing the door, frame and furniture, which you'll have to do with the brick wall anyway. I suppose you'll need some way of getting the plasterboard home, though. My minibus with roof rails means I never need to think about such things.
Plasterboarding is much simpler than the wet plastering you're intending to do on the brick wall. There's not normally a need to insulate an internal wall, although it can be beneficial in some circumstances.
Christian.
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have
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to
With a bathroom and toilet there is. Fermacell drylining means no wet skills whatsoever. Just using filler for the screws and boards joints.
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Correction, I've since checked and they're 54 kilos but feel like 65 by the time you get to the top of the stairs...
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Christian McArdle wrote:

Dry-lining?
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By the time you've drylined a brick wall, it'll be several inches wider than a standard stud partition and even harder to screw things to.
Christian.
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