British/French plumbing

Page 1 of 3  
Every house that I have ever rented in France, plus all the in-laws houses, all have plumbing where the cold water supply to every tap/appliance is run direct from the mains, therefore no cold water tank.
Are their any fundamental reasons why we (in the UK) prefer to use the cold water tank supply for all but (usually) the kitchen sink. Water pressure perhaps?
Just curious.
AndyP
-- "Wisest are they that know they do not know." Socrates
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

houses,
run
cold
I'm not aware that we do! All the houses I've owned have had all the cold taps directly supplied from the mains, with the water tank simply being the header for the hot system.
Roger
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Roger Mills wrote:

That's how my house is set up, too - the cold cistern/tank only supplies the hot water tank.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
in message

the
Ours too. I've lived in several C19th houses (with original water systems) and an early C20th house. Our present house was built in 1937 with hot and cold water systems. All the cold water systems come directly from the main.
We don't even have a header tank now since spouse installed a multipoint water heater but the lavatory cistern is still in place.
Mary
Mary

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

houses,
run
cold
We are just backwards. But about half of the systems going into new homes are mains pressure systems. We banned them until 1986, yet an Englishman invented them.
The traditional British/Irish system does have its advantage: in a water outage you have stored water for flushes and drinking if boiled. It has no moving parts except the ballcock in the cold tank, so very reliable, whereas the unvented system has complex pressure control valves and expensive high pressure cylinders. All is at low pressure, so cheaper low pressure taps, that don't drip as much, and cylinders.
The only tap you need high pressure is at the showers, so you can now buy showers with integrated shower pumps, solving that problem (poor showers and sluggish British plumbing is still a joke on the Continent and in the USA). They also take more piping.
The Continental mains are designed to carry high pressures and high flows, with little influence from one draw-off tap to another. In the US it is common to see a 1 1/2" main entering a house. I noticed last week that in a new
Our system is historical (the UK developed the first water systems in the modern era), where the main reservoirs and mains pipes were not big enough when towns expanded. The same thought of built in expansion that went into London's sewers did not go into the water systems. There is a reservoir in all the lofts all over a city; the reservoir cost is partyly pushed onto the consumer. We have not changed as the system works being perfected with time and we are familiar with it. The cold tank is in a unused part of the house, the loft, as we still install cold roofs (backwards again). If we had warm roofs the area up there would be used and we would do what the rest of the world does and use mains pressure systems.
--
--

Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com ).
Version: 6.0.524 / Virus Database: 321 - Release Date: 06/10/2003
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

houses,
run
cold
Most also have cheaper electricity bills which make it easier to have sealed mains pressure hot water systems as well.
--
www.basecuritysystems.no-ip.com

Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

sealed
These can be run off gas.
--
--

Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com ).
Version: 6.0.524 / Virus Database: 321 - Release Date: 06/10/2003
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

is
pressure
Yep. But even that works out cheaper than over here.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 08 Oct 2003 19:27:47 GMT, "BigWallop" >> > Most also have cheaper electricity bills which make it easier to have

Eh, no actually.
See the EU's benchmarking figures. http://europa.eu.int/comm/energy/electricity/benchmarking/doc/2/sec_2002_1038_en.pdf
Page 43 shows the gas figures for each member country. UK is 2nd cheapest shown for gas for domestic customers. Indeed it has always been one of the cheapest since 1995. The UK gas market liberalisation has been a huge success and now sets the standard for the whole EU.
Page 36 shows electricity prices for consumers. UK is slightly higher than average for the EU but not hugely more expensive (try Italy or Germany for that).
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Might it also be to do with the fact that we own our supplies, and others don't?
--
*Consciousness: That annoying time between naps.

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@argonet.co.uk London SW 12
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 09 Oct 2003 13:39:26 +0100, Dave Plowman

The fact is prices for domestic consumers (indeed, all consumers) dropped very significantly following the liberalisation of the market. This really is something the british did well (excepting the wideboy door-to-door tactics of a few of the suppliers).
Having our own gas helps but others have their own supplies also (the dutch , danish, irish, etc.) The UK is set to become a net importer over the next few years - our gas is running out. We'll be getting gas from Norway (pipeline networks being joined just now) and from Russia via continental Europe (current interconnector moving to reverse flow and another is to be built). Prices will rise over the next few years to reflect the higher transport charges being incurred as we move to Siberian imports but the same is true for most EU countries.
AA
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
...

In France, you don't get mains gas outside towns.
Colin Bignell
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Nor inside many towns. Even parts of Paris don't have it, but bottled gas is delivered and the empties collected like we [used to] do with milk.
--
Andrew Gabriel

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
my surname here>.uk.com> writes:

We have a milkman who delivers and collects bottles.
--
--

Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com ).
Version: 6.0.524 / Virus Database: 321 - Release Date: 06/10/2003
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Wouldn't milk be more useful?
--
*Some days we are the flies; some days we are the windscreen.*

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@argonet.co.uk London SW 12
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
my surname here>.uk.com> writes:

I have to go to the village shop for mine, but I wouldn't want to keep making the trip if it were used for anything more than hob-top cooking. The central heating boiler is fed from a large gas tank buried in the garden, which gets filled about once a year, but hot water is still from electric flow boliers.
Colin Bignell
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Not quite bottled gas but our LPG tank is refilled monthly as required with no intervention required from us (except paying for the gas).
--
Chris Green ( snipped-for-privacy@x-1.net)

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Because you are Brits? Ways of doing things differ from country to country. Sometimes, national variations are just a waste of money, but wouldn't it be sort of boring if we were to do away with these differences? It would be like modern cars: All look the same. Sure, it's functional and efficient, but boring.
/Clas-Henrik
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Dee wrote:

IIRC the water byelaws were changed in the arly 1980s to permit the use of mains cold taps throughout the house. Slowly when houses are refurbished or combi boilers fitted or unvented cylinder/heat stores are installed the picture will change.
--
Ed Sirett - Property maintainer and registered gas fitter.
The FAQ for uk.diy is at www.diyfaq.org.uk
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

of mains cold taps throughout the house.
This setup seems to have always been the norm in certain parts of the country - I've lived in various towns/cities around the north & midlands and I've only ever seen one house that had the cold taps run from a header tank, all the others (of varying ages) were fed direct from the mains.
Nick
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.