Bog standard building regs questions

Are there any hard and fast rules in the building regs that state, for a standard 2 storey domestic dwelling...
1) How big an external rear door (that you might need to get out of in the event of a fire) needs to be, e.g. 78" x 30" min or whatever?
2) Whether a 2nd WC (1st WC being inside in a bathroom) can be a downstairs outside loo (ie no internal access).
Or would any issues along these lines be down to the opinion of a building inspector?
Paul.
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On Wed, 3 Sep 2003 12:51:11 -0000, a particular chimpanzee named "Paul
produced:

Depends whether the house is existing or a new-build.
For new-builds, there are requirements that at least one entrance door (ideally, the one closest to the parking) is wide enough for a wheelchair and has a level threshold. An 838mm standard doorleaf is usually needed. There also has to be an internal WC on the ground floor.
For existing houses, the only requirement is that there is at least one internal WC. Where you put another one is down to yourself.
--
Hugo Nebula
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Hugo Nebula wrote:

Another piece of blanket legislation that, seemingly, has no scope for flexibility to allow it to be applied sensibly in a given situation.
A neighbour has just demolished half of his bungalow and is now building an extension at the rear to replace what has been demolished. When that's done, he's building a new house on the plot created by the demolition. As the plot slopes down slightly from front to rear he intended to put a split-level through lounge/dining room in both properties but, because of all these regs, he can't do it in the new one but can in the existing one (because it is an alteration/extension).
The daft thing about this is that when the project is finished he (who isn't disabled, nor are any of his family or friends) will live in the new regulation-compliant house and the old bungalow is going on the market, possibly to be bought by a disabled person who needs the features that the regs provide.
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On Wed, 03 Sep 2003 21:36:03 +0000, a particular chimpanzee named parish <parish_AT_ntlworld.com> randomly hit the keyboard and produced:

Does he know if any of those friends or relatives will never find themselves in a wheelchair? Is he or they immune to disease or accidents? What about the people who live in the house after him? For significant periods of their lives a great many people are disabled by a lack of reasonable access to 'conventionally designed' dwellings, such as mothers with push chairs, temporary disability or even old age. The requirements for access to dwellings are there to allow more people the freedom to leave their own house and visit others.
There is flexibility in the Approved Document for split level houses and those on steep sites.
--
Hugo Nebula
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Hugo Nebula wrote:

I see these regulations as a money saving scheme by the Govt. It will save them money by not having to pay (through grants and benefits) for modifications to houses for people with special needs. That is what the Welfare State is about. Don't anyone get me wrong, I'm not advocating discrimination against the disabled but I object to have restrictions imposed for these reasons. It's another sympton of a creeping malaise thats pushing this country down the toilet.

Well, they weren't flexible in my neighbours case (or maybe that was just our LA, North Wilts).
If you bought a plot of land to build a house on that would have stunning views from the first floor, you may well wish to build the house "upside down" with the reception rooms upstairs and the bedrooms downstairs. How flexible would the regulations be in that situation?
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downstairs
I'm intrigued by your title and the use of the term 'Bog Standard' (as in 'Bog Standard Comprehensives', etc?)
BOG was originally derived from the expression British Or German, as these were the only respectable standards in the world at one time, so it should be a complimentary expression! BAH
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