Bodge central or is it just my house? ;-)

Who's idea was this house refurb malarky ?
I've no intention of ever moving house ever again when and if I get this one finished I shudder to think of the new bodges I would find elsewhere.
Trying to sort the bathroom so I can install my sparkly new white suite instead of the chocolate coloured one that was pretending to be a bathroom previously.
The list of things I've found is ridiculous for just one room that's big enough for a bath, sink and toilet.
Artex on ceiling, scraped off by hand, painstaking but I can't be arsed redoing it with new plasterboard, getting it skimmed as the walls need doing anyway.
Found old pipes (gas water heater ?) still in the walls.
The nice original tiles on the windowsill which are rather nice in a rustic way had been butchered and the faces broken off to fit some crappy brown tiles over them.
The old bath I cut out to leave the taps for now and found the floor under it rotten. I suspected this from a board that was the same in the adjoining bedroom but didn't know the exact cause.
The sink I smashed to bits from around the taps in a fit of temper, only to find a bottle of vodka hidden behind the pedestal !! Empty...
The toilet overflow is some really cheap plastic pipe and runs from the toilet all the way across to room to the bath outfall. The overflow in the wall runs uphill through the wall.... then even better the elbow on the overflow pipe is smaller in diameter than the outfall pipe so it has been rested on the lip of the outfall pipe. So when/if the cistern overflows the water runs to the elbow and fearing the lack of gravity runs out onto the floor.... flipping outstanding workmanship !
Result, three full floorboards to cut out that had rotted, explains the sag in the kitchen ceiling. The joists are thankfully ok apart from some surface damage. The skirting along the same wall had rotted as well. Who thinks these things up.
Both the sink and bath wastes run uphill which would explain the stink from the traps/pipes, both jointed with some massive blobs of mastic of some sort. The bath one a triumph of bodging, waste trap then a plastic connector which was fastened to a length of copper pipe which goes into a plastic pipe then to the outfall. The holes in the walls they made to fit them badly are huge, the sink one you could get your head in. :-) They filled them in nicely though with bits of sandstone from the garden and a cross between filler and plaster, nice one there Mr Bodger.
The hole for the toilet waste I've not hacked out yet but the loose stuff from behind it fell out when I took the skirting off so I can guess it's a larger version of the other two.
I've thankfully Monday and Tuesday off work so hopefully might get the outfalls replaced and the rest patched up if nothing else.
One note is it ok to cut off the existing copper pipework and replace it further back with plastic pushfit to the new bathroom suite ?
I've a box full of connectors already (swapped for a pc months ago) and like the idea of the individual service valves etc.
Sorry for the rant. ;-)
On the plus side inbetween the ceiling work I stopped scraping and happened to overhear two neighbours outside in ones garden saying my fence I've finally finished looked good. :-)
Mark S.
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wrote:

You really must remember not to move into a Barratts house ;)
Andrew
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Ahhhhh ( sigh).......Isn't it lovely the joys of home ownership can bring. (?) Just think, in a few months time, when you've finished making good all the bodged stuff, some innocent party will say " Do you think it will be alright to change the.............AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA !!!! NO !!!! Definitely Not !!!
Ah Yes. I can hear those words of love ringing in my ears. :-))
Good luck with the rest of it Mark.
--
BigWallop

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Hi Mark,
<<snip>>

Lol, sounds as tasty as the advacadot suite in my place... it matched the wall tiles too :(

How old is the house? If it's Victorian (ish) and the gas pipes in the wall are about the diameter of your little finger, chances are they are for gas lighting ;)
<<snip>>
Well, to cheer you up, my Victorian pile was derelict for 2 yrs before I moved in and the back of the place was damp from top to bottom. It had also been previously inhabited by a master bodger :( To compare bathrooms: ripped out old suite pulled down bust ceiling new floorboards + 2 joists hacked back and replastered the walls new lintel reset inside brick skin around / above window new window box new window tiled walls banged up battens to lower ceiling 16 inches new ceiling rewired with sealed mains spots ripped out old lead replaced with copper replumbed new bath sink and bog new towel rad tiled floor
I won't bore you with all the other stuff, I'll reduce myself to tears ;) Maybe I'll get round to putting it on a website or something.

Nice ;))
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No problems doing that. It makes life so much easier in the future if you have a service valve for every piece of kit.
Congratulations on the fence and good luck with the bathroom.
Sean
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On Sun, 6 Jul 2003 08:51:44 +0000 (UTC), "Sean Delere"

One thing to watch out for with service valves is that they do reduce the bore of the pipe quite a bit.
This may not matter too much with mains fed taps, but on low pressure will slow the flow down a lot.
A good alternative with full bore is to use lever ball valves. They do completely seal off (unlike gate valves which also tend to stick).
.andy
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wrote:

Thanks for the comments guys. :-)
And the pointers Andy, helpful as always.
Just have to decide now which neighbours offer of ladders to take up. :-))
Mark S.
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Mark wrote:
<snipped tales of bodgery>
This is entirely normal. When re-furbing a house you expect to take it down to the structure and beyind, because the anything that can be bodged, will have been. OTOH, if its warm, keeps the rain off yer head, and has nice neighbours, count yer blessings and shut yer mouf.
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wrote:

It's warm, keeps the rain off apart from the gutters where they join on the neighbours, neighbours are putty in my hands, had Steptoe (only in looks) across yesterday for a barrow of topsoil, got a couple of tons spare, some bags and two fence rails for the guy next door in exchange for his cement mixer when I need it, more offers of tools and ladders, tea/coffee than you can shake a stick at so guess I should keep quiet. ;-)
Mark S.
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Around 25 years ago.

That happened in a rented house I lived in for a couple of years. It was an upstairs bathroom in a 1969 Anglia Homes house (chipboard everywhere). One day, the loo just keeled over, and was only stopped from ending up in the kitchen sink below by the lino on the bathroom floor. Fortunately, no one was sitting on it at the time...
--
Andrew Gabriel

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<snip> Gratitude makes all the difference.
Regards, NT
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