boarding a loft

Hi,
I'm thinking of boarding out my loft. Are there any recommended materials that should be used? I've tried to do a bit of research on-line but seem to end up going in circles. Searching for "loft flooring" and similar on the big DIY store sites returns very little (well I haven't searched the Homebase site because it's experiencing technical difficulties at the moment). I've located a product via Travis Perkins called Fermacell which looks like it might do the trick.
Any pointers would be appreciated.
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Pete
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A cheap option is cheap option is 8' by 4' 18mm chipboard sheets
Pete Lawrence wrote:

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On Mon, 13 Oct 2003 11:15:31 +0100, Pete Lawrence

I boarded a loft recently, using the standard loft flooring packs available at B&Q and elsewhere.
About 3.70 per pack as I recall, covers roughly 1.5m x 2 bays.
PoP
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On Mon, 13 Oct 2003 11:15:31 +0100, Pete Lawrence

There are packs of small sized flooring grade chipboard available from DIY stores that are sold for this purpose. The idea is that the sections will fit through a loft hatch. They push together with a tongued and grooved joint.
However the pieces are quite heavy and awkward to manipulate around in a small space.
For doing this job, having two people, with one cutting the pieces and the other fitting makes a big difference to how long it takes. It is not pleasant cutting chipboard witha circular say in the attic.
I prefer to use floorboards. They cost a little more, but are much easier to cut, handle and fit. If you go to a timber merchants they are a lot less expensive than the DIY stores
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wrote:

I've been aware of the chipboard packs, and seen them, in the past. However a quick on-line search this morning failed with HomeBase (still having technical difficulties) and DIY.com returned nothing specific for lofts and "We don't currently stock chip board" for a search on chip board.
I'll call round to my local timber merchant and investigate floorboards.
Thanks for the response.
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I tried searching for these on the B&Q website this morning with no joy, however I popped into one at lunch and they had stacks of them. They are 3.87 for a 3 pack, and yes they are quite heavy.
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wrote:

Thanks - I'll have to rely on the real rather than the virtual world here.
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The BandQ website only seems to show items which they will deliver (and take orders for by internet or phone), which probably corresponds to those items which are the same price at big BandQs as at the smaller ones.
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wrote:

Well something else you won't find on the b&q website is fibreglass rolls......
Buying T&G chipboard at your local independent merchant should also be cheaper, at around 5 for an 8x2 3/4" thick board. Also make sure the boards are up to standard - BS EN 312-4 (or -5 moisture resistant) off the top of my head
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wrote:

I would tend to agree, however when I did a loft a couple of months back it was only me - and I was mildly surprised at how little effort was required to cut the boards with a sharp circular saw (a fairly powerful one though).
That was in the hot weather in July.....
PoP
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Firstly, Fermacell is very expensive for boarding out a loft. Wickes do cheap T&G chip board packs.
Once you have boarded a loft you are stuck with the poor insulation beneath. Best to install 4x2s at 90 degrees to the joints. Screw them down with long screws available from http://www.unifix-online.co.uk . Having counter joists will drastically reduce thermal bridging from the loft in summer and winter. Then install Rockwool insulation over the existing insulation, then loft boards over, available from Wickes. Screw down the boards. Do not nail. Screws are cheap enough these days and it is quick with a drill/driver. Hammering can disturb parts of the ceiling.
Before doing the work, take a silicon gun and seal all the holes into the rooms below. That includes pipes, and holes where cables penetrate. Also fit a sealed loft hatch. Then a boarded loft, that will save you a fortune in heating and keep the rooms below cool in summer too.
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Thanks to all who have responded.
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Pete
Homepage at http://www.pbl33.co.uk
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Pete Lawrence wrote:

Beware if you have a modern house with flimsy 1st floor ceiling joists. These do not like much loading on them at all, as I and my neighbours have found. A few boxes of junk on them and ceiling cracks appear along the line of the joists.. Also if you screw the boarding to them they may distort again to the detriment of your bedroom ceilings as the builders only seem to get the ceiling side somewhat level.
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the
If you put in counter joists at 90 degrees, the ends of the joists butting up to the end gables can be hung off joist hangers screwed to the wall. This reduces stain on the joists and re-enforces the roof.
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wrote:

Fortunately my house is quite sturdy in it's construction. It's a good point though and I'll certainly keep an eye on the ceilings.
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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com says...

If your loft hatch is big enough use normal flooring sheets - much cheaper.
Paul
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