blue neon light

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We have a glass block wall in our kitchen, and would really like to put a blue light behind it. I am thinking some sort of neon / fluorescent (sp?) light would look best. Has anyone got any recomendations? It is actually a little cubby hole for our cat to eat, and in an ideal world I would love to find a neon cat shaped light. Mad I know. Am I dreaming?
Daniel
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Daniel wrote:

You can get blue 'neon' type lamps made specailly, at a price. Try google.
I think blue is argon, or mercury vapour actualy, neon is mainly orange.
Otherwise blue pygmy bulbs are readily available. Or are they called 'borgs' these days (Bulbs of Restricted Growth) :-)

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Hello The

This was explained recently on a kiddies program in a way that even I kinda got the idea - it /is/ Neon. What happens is that Neon also emits shedloads of ultra violet light. To get different colours, the inside of the tube is coated with pigments that react in different colours when energised by ultraviolet.
So the neon creates ultraviolet. The UV transfers energy to the coating. Coating glows and emits colour of choice.
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Simon Avery, Dartmoor, UK
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If they want other colours they use [some other gas - mercury vapour?] in the tube to make the uv and then add a fluorescent coating as described.
Normal white fluorescent tubes work that way as well.
--
Tim Mitchell

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Mixed with the directly visible neon emission.

It's got lots of lines, and certainly into the UV. It is used for exciting UV phosphors, although the UV won't get through ordinary glass construction neon lamps.

Mercury vapour has the problem that the vapour pressure varies enormously with temperature, affecting both the light output and the electrical characteristics. This isn't much use in cold-cathode signage tubes which need to work well when cold and the mercury vapour pressure is too low, or if increased for cold working, it's too high if the tube warms up.

Older tubes are designed to work at 25C ambient with bulb wall at 40C and get dimmer if you move away from this in either direction. (They can be made to order for different operating temperatures.) Newer tubes, particularly compact fluorescents, contain an amalgam which absorbs and releases mercury depending on its temperature and this stablises the mercury vapour pressure inside the tube for varying lamp temperatures, at least over a wider range than for older fluorescent tubes. There is a delay whilst the amalgam pellet adjusts to varying temperatures (which is why compact fluorescents take a minute or so to reach full output).
This is fine for lamps which are on continuously, but not for neon signage which often isn't, and has to run at exposed outdoor temperatures.
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Andrew Gabriel

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Simon Avery wrote:
Hi Simon,

There are actually two types of blue tubes, those which have a phosphor coating, and those which don't.
Tubes with a phosphor coating work in almost the way you describe (as do common-or-garden fluorescents). I say almost because while the fill is almost entirely neon, neon doesn't emit much UV at all, it's the trace mercury content which does that.
These tubes can be identified by the fact that they are opaque - due to the phosphor coating.
The second type are clear, because they're just glass tubes with argon in them. These emit blue light which is emitted directly by the argon fill, with no phosphor being involved.
--
Grunff


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That's interesting, because at Magna we had bottles of Argon as used by signage designers, mounted in a case, with 22kV (or something) clunked onto each end when people walked past.
The "sparks" inside were definitely mauvey - I'd say more towards the orange than the blue :-)
Hmmm...
Hwyl!
M.
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Martin Angove wrote:

Exacrly. Each gas has a characteristic spectrum, as described by Fraunhofer: The color ypu preceive from a direct gas dicsharge lamp depends on where te spectral lines are and how string they are. Neon is predomniantly a red/orange emitter, with negligible UV, other inert gases are different. By combining them you can get a variety of colors. I suspect this is in fact what sign makers do.

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Grunff wrote:

Thanks. I knew it wsn't neon, but for the life of me...nonetheless all such (direct emitting) tubes in the UK are comonly called 'neon' lights. As opposed to 'fluoreescent lights', which of course in the USA are called 'neon lights'
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But neon tubes are clear glass? Sure you're not confusing them with fluorescent tubes?
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*I want it all and I want it delivered

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@argonet.co.uk London SW 12
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Simon Avery wrote:

I think not actually. In the USA any fluorescent light is called a 'neon' light, and what you have descrbed is what we call fluorescent lights. They are normally filled with mercuty vapiour and an inert halodegn as well - I think argon normally. The tubes are caietd with phosphors to re-emit UV in the visible spectrum.
Traditionally what WE call a 'neon light' is a pure discharge tube - not a coated one - of which the original ones were red/orange and contained neon. The sort used to make advertising signs. I don't know what gasess are in the red, blue green and yellow ones, but I am pretty sure it ain't neon.
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On 21 Nov 2003 07:09:50 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@valoris.com (Daniel) wrote:

Well you can just contact a signmaker and he will bend a glass tube into the shape of a cat, fill it with neon (actually he won't - if you want blue he will fill it with argon and add a microscopic amount of mercury) and then seal it.
Adrian.
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Adrian Sims wrote:

What?? You'd allow mercury in your house?
:-)
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I didn't say that! Sadly I think I was exposed to much more mercury in the chemistry lab than I'd get in 1000 years from a neon sign...have to wait to see if the dementia sets in early! :-)
A.
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I got my exposure in grammer school physics. polarity reversing switches with pools of mercury as terminals; amalgamating ha'pennies to shillings and our house keys.
Never did me any h
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On Fri, 21 Nov 2003 17:23:40 +0000, Grunff wrote:

Do you have any "normal" fluorescent tubes in your house? Then you already have plenty of mercury ;-o
Timbo
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Or a medical thermometer.
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"The road to Paradise is through Intercourse."
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Huge wrote:

I know! That was an ironic reference to the earlier fluoride thread, gettit?
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writes

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Daniel wrote:

Get a few ultra-bright blue LEDs (Maplin etc). Will look lovely.
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