Bath Wastes and Rubber Seals

I am refurbing a 1970s bathroom and should receive my bath today. This is an Aquarius acrylic model with an "Aquanite" coating.
My question relates to the waste outlet fittings available now. They all seem to be plastic with corrugated plastic overflow pipes which simply push into the waste body with a feeble "o" ring seal.
Are the all metal body types still available? The sheds and local plumbers don't know. If they are, are they suitable for an acrylic bath?
Finally, where the waste grill fits into the bath outlet, the seal method seems to be a thin rubber washer. Do these not harden and leak after a year or two's exposure to hot/cold conditions?
Any recommendations on best practice for sealing waste outlet and tap bodies to bath greatly appreciated.
TIA
Phil
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plumbers
bodies
I have this exact bath (and am very pleased with it). I have the Bristan waste kit, which has metal wastes but a plastic pipe. I had no problem with the waste, but I needed to use silicon sealant round the overflow as I couldn't tighten it enough to stop water seeping out the back (the aquanite isn't very flat behind).
No problems with the pipe pushing into the waste fitting though, seems fairly strong.
HTH, Al
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On Wed, 18 Feb 2004 09:04:24 -0000, "Al Reynolds"

One tip from having done this myself recently. Test the outfall with a quantity of water in the bath as it was ok with the tap running but leaked when "backed up" with half a bath of water. ;-)
Mark S.
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Thanks, Al and Mark
Mark, your reply leads me back to the question posed initially. The waste outlets generally sold by merchants are supplied with rubber sealing washers to sandwich between the chrome grill outlet and the top surface of the bath. My concern is whether these will stay the course, or whether the old "plumber's mait" would make for a safer seal.
I also have reservations about these plastic bodied waste outlet assemblies, held in place by a central screw. Far less substantial than the cast bodied older versions with banjo style overflow connections. Call me old fashioned, but whenever metal is replaced by plastic (particularly for a part that's hopefully going to last for many years leak free) I just see parts that will fail or require regular tweaking to achieve longevity.
Phil
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On Thu, 19 Feb 2004 08:45:18 -0000, "TheScullster"

Well I was told to use mait on the outfall but I slapped too much on meaning the seal didn't seat properly when tightened up hence the leak. I took some off and left just a little and it was ok. I don't like the hand tighten this and that as in the cistern inlet's case it leaked like a sieve until I tightened it with a spanner... Same with the bath overflow and the taps they were loose until I used mechanical tightening. ;-)
I'm more bothered about the stupid use of so many "standards", 32mm/40mm, 3/4" this and that, a right pain in the bum for novice plumber's... Mark S.
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