Basic electrical question

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I'm installing a kitchen in a couple of weeks time and have a question.
I have to move my heater/water controller from one wall to another it has 8 wires. As I'm going to need more wire to move the box is it okay to isolate the cable in a junction box in the ceiling void and then join the new cable in this box?
I'd thought it to be no problem but thought I'd ask first.
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On Mon, 2 Feb 2004 19:58:08 -0000, "MattP" <@tiscali.co.uk {add mattspersonal before @}> wrote:

If it is going to be inaccessible (as this will be) then the joints need to be crimp types and not screw terminals (as in chocolate block)
.andy
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you will know the joint is there in the ceiling void, but the next person who buys your house wont. bear in mind that you could end up in a house where someone else had done this, imagine how pissed off you'd be if there was a loose connection and you couldn't find it. rob
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writes

And anyway, you can guarantee that if you did box in a junctions box it would get a loose connection.
As someone else said, you need to put in crimped connections (though if possible I'd replace the whole cable)
--
Chris French, Leeds

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I've never had a screw connection come loose in all the years I've been DIYing electrics. Seen it many times on 'pro' installations, though - I'd say it's one of the main causes of faults. Perhaps 'pro' sparks are rather limp wristed?
--
*Beauty is in the eye of the beer holder *

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@argonet.co.uk London SW 12
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London SW 12

I'd like to invite you to our site to put forward this interesting theory. Oh, and what flowers would you like in hospital? Richard. ps. written with tongue FIRMLY in cheek. (MY tongue / MY cheek before anyone goes for the easy shot)
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On Tue, 3 Feb 2004 19:53:11 -0000, "Frisket"

.andy
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So long as the JB is accesable for future inspection,then yes go ahead making sure of good workmanship and mechanically sound connections. Also advisble to insulation test the circuit after the described works are carried out.
Jon.
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Would the same prinicple apply to cables e.g. cooker and kitchen sockets?
My problem is that I have a Barrets home, and so the floorboards are made of chipboard and the've used 6" nails to secure the boards down. It has been impossible to lift the board for the sockets without breaking it, if I've got to replace the whole cable that's a lot of destructive work. Plan B is to use a router to cut around the nails and replace with screws.
Any giudance appreciated.

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Trouble with chipboard flooring is the edges are T&G joined, so even if it's screwed down it usually breaks when lifting - unless you lift the entire floor.
--
*How about "never"? Is "never" good for you?

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@argonet.co.uk London SW 12
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To be honest Dave I got out the circular saw and cut down through the T&G, did a great job expcept that on the first cut the depth plate slipped and I cut a 1" slot in the ceiling joist. Can't see it being a problem as it's a 20cm deep joist, however, will make good using 'sister' pieces and bolts.
I'll replace the old c.board with new and screw them down not nail gun it.
However, I don't understand why they had to use such long nails when the upstairs hallway boards are screwed down. I've got to go through at least another 2 boards yet.
Whadya think of the router option to cut the board away from the nails?
London SW 12

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Oh dear. ;-) I tend to use a jigsaw for this sort of thing, with a blade snapped off to the maximum depth of cut I need. Slower than a circular saw, though.

Absolutely. Screws don't come loose.

I'd say they'd run out of the proper fixings. Work *must* go on...

Personally, I'd cut traps rather than lifting whole sections, since boards without the tongue and groove will move rather too much where they're not supported. You can batten round the traps and get a good fixing to that. But the main thing which ever way is to get a good rigid floor with no creaks.
--
*Some days we are the flies; some days we are the windscreen.*

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@argonet.co.uk London SW 12
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http://www.armeg.com/electrical-sbccablerod.php
SJW A.C.S. Ltd.
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Works very well - ideal for cutting a floorboard across the middle of a joist without risk of hitting a pipe. You don't need to even make a hole to start it - you start with the blade horizontal and just lower it into the board.
--
*The early bird gets the worm, but the second mouse gets the cheese *

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@argonet.co.uk London SW 12
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Jigsaw. You have a bit more control than with the circular saw.
--
Chris French, Leeds

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Also, if lifting floorboards which are to be covered afterwards, you can cut round the original nails, which you can't really do with an circular saw. Of course if ripping T&G, a straight line might be more useful. ;-)
--
*If at first you don't succeed, destroy all evidence that you tried *

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@argonet.co.uk London SW 12
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Dave Plowman wrote:

Except in junction boxes?
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wrote:

.andy
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Heh heh. I've come across poorly crimped cables, so it's not a universal panacea. Perhaps some form of locking screw - or a double screw JB would be more reliable?
--
*Puritanism: The haunting fear that someone, somewhere may be happy.

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@argonet.co.uk London SW 12
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