Any reason not to put 13A sockets upside down?

Page 2 of 3  


It really depends on the situation doesn't it? In 'living' rooms I think higher sockets do make sense as there really aren't many cases where floor level ones are any better and higher ones are simply easier to reach for *everyone*.
Now I think about it even in my study (where I was going to say lower sockets might make sense) I have added a lot of sockets at just above desk height and they're the ones that get used all the time.
--
Chris Green ( snipped-for-privacy@x-1.net)

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Dave" wrote | Number one son, in a brand new ground floor flat (Very North | Sctland) has most of his sockets mounted about 6 to 8 inches | from the floor. No where near the 450 to 1200mm mentioned above.
People are generally talking about the English Building Regulations. I don't know off-hand whether Scotland has comparable provisions in our B Regs for the height of sockets.
Owain
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
David W.E. Roberts wrote:

450mm/1200mm from memory.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

down
was
top
A lot of people hold the plug between thumb and middle finger, leaving the first finger to, possibly, hang over the top of the plug. That is not a problem if the earth is there and may not be a problem with modern sheathed pins on live and neutral. However, with an older plug, having unsheathed pins, there is a (fairly remote) possibility of touching a live pin when insterting the plug.
Of course, even before the current requirements to have the sockets half way up the wall, there should always have been at least 150mm clearance under the socket, to allow for the cable to bend easily.
Colin Bignell
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 30 Oct 2003 14:15:11 -0000, nightjar wrote:

My father was involved in the implementation of the requirement for sleeved pins and tells me that this was purely to satisfy government busybodies who were convinced there was a danger despite the evidence presented to them by the electrical accessories industry. The sockets are designed so that contact is lost before the plug is far enough out for your fingers to slide behind the plug.

I feel that the regulations are just too strict - maybe the required height range is sensible, but there should be some flexibility to allow for circumstances (computer desk with back that would block access to sockets any higher than skirting level; tv on wall bracket high up - I want the plug hidden behind it; display cabinets with internal lights - I'd prefer the sockets above the units so that they can be unplugged without moving the cabinet and cabinet is in alcove, preventing socket to either side). I know that this is *very* detailed planning, but if I'm having a house built and know how I'm going to use certain rooms, why shouldn't I have the choice to do what is practical for me. If someone buys the house later and wants the sockets elsewhere, they can move them. If someone in my family became disabled, I'd move the sockets that were a problem for them.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
...

sleeved
who
by
My recollection is that MK marketed them as a safety feature, along with a screwless cord grip, for several years before regulation made them compulsory.

slide
Perhaps that is the case today. However, even with my size of fingers, I've given myself a jolt that way, so it would have been a lot easier for a child to do so.
Colin Bignell
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Plenty of electronics have small value capacitors for RFI reasons that can give you a tingle if you touch the appropriate pins shortly after unplugging or while unplugging.
--
*Beauty is in the eye of the beer holder...

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@argonet.co.uk London SW 12
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
my surname here>.uk.com> wrote:

1) I've touched live mains often enough to know the difference 2) I was plugging it in 3) It was a two-bar electric fire
Colin Bignell
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Nightjar wrote:

The very earliest MK ones (late 1960's?) had spring loaded sleeves that went into the body of the plug as you pushed it into the socket.
--
Tony Bryer SDA UK 'Software to build on' http://www.sda.co.uk
Free SEDBUK boiler database browser
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

They also had a socket with a very short contact length, so that there was a near immediate disconnection. It was also intended to be finger-proof against small children.
Give them 10-20 years and the extra contact springs went weak, leading to a poor connection, high resistance and overheating. My parents had one that had a damned good go at starting a fire
-- Die Gotterspammerung - Junkmail of the Gods
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I believe that the requirement is only when they could reasonably be expected to be used by disabled guests. I'm sure there would be nothing to prevent you having a high socket for a specific reason (i.e. the TV mounting), provided there are enough low ones for granny to plug in her mobile.
Christian.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 31 Oct 2003 14:17:06 -0000, Christian McArdle wrote:

As long as the BCOs see it this way, that's fair enough.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Somewhere around age 4, I managed to do this without any trouble...

This reminds me of an article I just read on The Register
    http://www.theregister.co.uk/content/4/32272.html
It's the waffle at the beginning I'm referring to, not the meat of the article (which is actually pretty non-existant).
--
Andrew Gabriel

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

The only issue I can think of is that for rewireable plugs (as opposed to moulded ones), there is a marginally higher risk of stuff falling into the plug, and if spilt liquid fell on the cable, it would run down into the plug.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Don't ask me which way they put them in Australia... ;)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

They have ELECTRICTY in Australia?
Cool!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Quality of british electrical accessories is a pet hate of mine,,, First the location, You can mount sockets in the floor or ceiling using a BS standard outlet, then any height on a wall and if a building inspector objects, tell him(or her) that it is nothing to do with them. The part P is Proposed not implemented and if it does become law (Blairs nanny state again) you can lodge an objection then an appeal and without doubt you will win. The IEE regulations are the basis of the proposed building regulations and have one purpose only and that MUST be interpereted into any requirment by a local authority (Council Building Inspector)and that purpose is "TO PREVENT DANGER". No organisation can make you conform to any electrical regulation just because it is a Regulation Good Luck Bob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The requirement is under Part M, not Part P. (Part M2, Section 8). It is current. It is not worded particularly strictly:
8.3 A way of satisfying the requirements would be to provide switches and socket outlets for lighting and other equipment in habitable rooms at appropriate heights between 450mm and 1200mm from finished floor level.
Christian.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 3 Nov 2003 09:24:31 -0000, Christian McArdle wrote:

Actually, that isn't the requirement. That is just an approved way of fulfilling the requirement, as are all the approved documents. The actual requirement is even more vague: "Reasonable provision shall be made for disabled people to gain access to and to use the building."
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
John Armstrong wrote:

Yep. I suggested to my building ispnector that I would build little ramps up to the light switches just in case any gnarled old ladies nedded to use the house, and remove them when they left.
He didn't seem to think it was that amusing.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.