A DIY question for a change

I'm hanging a new stable-type back door today. Done the hinges and fitted the doors in the frame and now I have to fit 2 Chubb mortice deadlocks. With all the modern machinery now available, is there a better way of forming the 75mm deep recesses for the locks? I'm still using the old brace and bit and finishing off with a chisel, what do you do?.
Ta Peter
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On Fri, 13 Feb 2004 13:40:56 -0000, "Peter Taylor"

I have a Trend lock jig for use with a router and a long bit. Total cost including bit about 85.
I was fitting about 15 oak doors though and this was a huge time saver..
I wouldn't bother for one or two locks, though.
.andy
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I use a flat bit in the cordless drill, then the chisel. I agrre with Andy, no point in spending huge wedges on tools you may only use once in a lifetime.
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wrote:

Not if you include the price of the router :)
I think you might be able to get the jig and bit for a lot less than 85 today - the lock jig is available on Screwfix for 39.99:
http://tinyurl.com/ypdfm
PoP
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I use a battery drill and chisel. If you're only doing a door or tool, specialist tools are seriously overkill. Ensure your chisels are sharp, though. I bought an el cheapo bench grinder for a tenner to ensure this. Great for paint scrapers too.
Christian.
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Christian wrote

Thanks. I just went out to buy a new flat bit and ended up getting an auger - they have hex shanks these days to fit in a battery drill, I didn't know that before. I think the auger will be easier to keep upright.
As for chisels, my Mrs bought me a lovely set of Marples yellow handle chisels last year and I'm keeping them just for fine jobs like this. For sharpening I use a bench grinder too, plus a small wet stone.
Peter
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On Fri, 13 Feb 2004 16:42:14 -0000, "Peter Taylor"

I think you're right regarding augers in the sense that the sides are supported all the way in. A useful tip is to put a square on the door edge with one side pointing towards you. You can then eyeball the drill angle well enough for this exercise.

A bench grinder can be too aggressive for chisel sharpening unless you are trying to remove a lot of material, which shouldn't be necessary unless you have damaged the chisel. Overheating can occur and that is bad news.
A method with water cooling is generally better if you can.

.andy
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I use auger bits with my drill in a drill guide. This has several advantages: Keeps bit square to surface Gives you a handle to oppose the torque of the bit, which can be considerable. Enables a depth stop, powered auger bits can grab and drill much further than you intended, especially in softwoods (I have some deeper than intended bench dog holes in my workbench from this).
Peter
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For anyone else buying chisels, I dont recommend marples, wickes, etc. There are 2 types of chisel. The old carbon steel type is a clear winner on performance, but the metal is hard and rigid, and the ends tend to chip if abused, ie if used as a lever, banged into concrete blocks etc. Marples etc use softer steel for abuse resistance, but woodwork performance is much poorer. As long as you know not to abuse them a (cheap) set of Flying Fang carbon steel chisels will make a mockery of Marples etc. I have both, and was surprised by the difference. I would never buy a marple type again.
Regards, NT
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Use muilti angle drill bits (screwfix) removes chisel work to a minimum
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