2 stroke chain saws

My small chain saw (Sachs-Dolmar 100) is a b&gger to start and I'm tempted to buy a new cheapie rather than mess about stripping, adjusting, etc. Are these new ones easy to start or are all chain saws a pain?
Dave S
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Dave wrote:

Stihl is great.
Most likly yours has worn bores.
Once compressions goes, total recon or skip job.

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tempted
Are
Thanks, I'll check compression at the weekend, 'anybody know what a reasonable pressure is for a small 2 stroke?
Dave S
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Dave wrote:

How old is it and how much use has it seen? I recently replaced my 15 year old Sachs-Dolmar 100 (because it got stolen from the shed) and it always started very easily. In fact, I was so happy with it that I got exactly the same one as the replacement (it's badged "Makita", but it's the same saw). You are using reasonably fresh petrol and do clean the air filter etc.? Anyway, if it is buggered, you should have no bother starting a new one: I've used a few cheapies belonging to friends and they were all a doddle to fire up.
Regards, Jim.
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the
I've
fire
I bought it 2nd hand several years ago but it hasn't done a lot. Fuel is fresh (perhaps a bit on the oily side of the ideal mixture) and filter is clean. I'll check the compression at the weekend and consider a strip down.
Dave S
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year
saw).
down.
The compression was good. After a partial strip (without splitting the crankcase) and rebuild it turned out to be two faults: a slightly perished fuel pipe and the flap valve in the carb not being in the first flush of youth. Until stripping this I hadn't realised how simple but ingenious chainsaw carbs were, they use the crankcase pressure pulse to operate a small diaphragm in the base of the carb - this pumps the fuel! I was also surprised that the magneto didn't use any points. It now starts (most of the time) and runs well but I keep having to fiddle with the 2 mixture screws trying to get settings that work hot and cold - any suggestions?
Dave S
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Hi,
1 and 1 is the standard but I would really need to see how the saw is behaving before advising how to adjust it further (its a black art). If the saw won't rev up properly then try opening the low screw 1/4.
You can buy carb gasket kits to replace all the perishable parts - again, your local friendly repair place should be able to help you with this.
Alan.

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Hi,
The Dolmar 100 is a half-decent wee saw. Miles better than the cheapies you get in the sheds. There are a multitude of reasons why it would be difficult to start and most of them not necessarily expensive to fix. Take your saw to a local repair place and get an estimate. Probably a good service is all it needs. If it is terminal, then they will give you good advice on a replacement.
You will have far more trouble with a cheapie long term than you have with your Dolmar. IMHO Dolmars (at least the older ones - I've no experience with the new ones) are decent saws which are solidly build and give little trouble. No saw should be difficult to start unless it has a fault.
Alan.

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