1st DIY project: loft flooring

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PoP wrote:

yes. i like the idea too. we could have it so that the outside door is parallel to the back door and make a coverd 'passage' with doors to the front and back gardens. i suppose it would cost a fortune though to have a garage like construction without garage door but with windows to the front and back and a side door ? i don't think that is something we could do ourselves.
sammi
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On 17/02/2004 sam ende opined:-

You can't do that. The floor would not likely be strong enough for this type of use, you would need to ensure proper access and a means of escape in case of fire. Basically any habitable room has to meet all the building regulations.
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Regards,
Harry (M1BYT) (L)
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There are many issues associated with loft conversions. Building regulation approval is essential, which may involve work in the following areas:
1. Floor joist strengthening 2. Insulation of roof. 3. Ventilation of roof timbers. 4. Fire escapes (usually by) (a) Making the house stairwell fire resistant (no open plan lounge/stairways) (b) Including a low down window for rescue by ladder/fire engine 5. Fireproofing the floor 6. Windows (velux/dormer, including 4(b) above). 7. Mains linked smoke detectors. 8. Adding staircase, including fireproof door at top or bottom. 9. Ensuring foundations are adequete/underpinning
Obviously, there is other work as well, which building control may be less interested in, or alternatively is optional depending on your needs. 1. Removing loft tanks and fixing CH/water systems to cope without. 2. Adding plumbing for en-suite/additional bathroom 3. Wiring
Often, you'll find it simply isn't possible to meet the requirements. However, if you can, you'll end up with a proper useful room that will add substantial value to your home. In most areas (ask a surveyor for specifics), the property value increase will exceed the cost of the works.
Christian.
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Christian McArdle wrote:
<snip>

right so it is a lot of work, probably expensive to do properly and i wouldn't gain all that much room. i might be better off building a garage with a room on top perhpas thank you though, it very informative and probably helping me come to a descision what to do best.
sammi
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It all depends on what you have to start with, the floor area, available height and the possibility of extending backwards with a dormer.
However, to get them to do the lot, rather than just the structural alterations, is going to cost from around 20K, providing there is no underpinning. Obviously, this can increase markedly if the conversion is large, or dormers are required, or for bathroom fitting etc.
Christian.
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Christian McArdle wrote:

that just isn't worth it i think c0nsidering the aomunt of space actually gained. i have space to the side of the house. i could put a garage there and perhaps ask them to put good foundations in should i want to build a room on top of it, and i can't see that costing 20 K, or ?
sammi
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