1st DIY project: loft flooring

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It's in the Western Centre in Western Road (near the tip) but is tucked away slightly so not obvious from the road as you drive by.
I opened an account with Wolseley Centers which includes Plumb Center, Builder Center etc. If you are a regular purchaser you can get better pricing as a result.
FWIW, the nearby WF Electrical is a useful source of supply, and I noticed last time I passed that a new Wickes is being built there, effectively at the back of Homebase. It will be interesting to see how Homebase move their prices.
.andy
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wrote:

You wouldn't think I live in Bracknell now would you? That's another piece of news! And I nearly live in Homebase some days.....
Thanks Andy & Christian.
PoP
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Various wrote etc
I can't understand this obsession with fixing loft boarding to the joists. If you are using 8x4 chipboard cut down and suitably adjusted to meet in the centre of the joist, fixings are a) not required b) a bad idea as it prevents movement and causes ceiling cracks.
As a previous poster said, I've had my loft boards up and down numerous times over the years and IMO fixing them down would have resulted in unnecessary work on many occasions. I personally would never use T & G boards for these reasons. I would add that some of my roof pitches are 17deg and this precludes fixings in a lot of areas as you can't either get them in or out!
Regards Capitol
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Christian McArdle wrote:

DON'T use screws. I neighbour did that in a modern house and ended up with many cracked bedroom ceilings... Whereas the ones who nailed didn't
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BillV wrote on Tuesday (17/02/2004) :

I fail to understand why that should be, unless the screws were installed with the use of a Manchester screwdriver.
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Harry (M1BYT) (L)
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I worked with a mad chippy who did that. He said you could still unscrew them, which was true ... kindof ... of the few he hadn't bent putting in :-|
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On Wed, 18 Feb 2004 01:02:28 -0800, "John Stumbles"

I guess one of the tricks of the trade which I never adopted (but I did see a workman do a long time ago) is to hammer the screws in. That way you get the best of both worlds - instant hold down and also removability ;)
PoP
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Hence a "Birmingham screwdriver" - nickname for a hammer.
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Generally speaking the loft boards you buy at Homebase et al will span 2 joists. However you can't always depend on it, and frequently you need to trim the end of the board to fit precisely.

Your joists might give way if you gave them that sort of treatment! The loft boards you buy at the DIY shed are fine for the general population, however if you are 20+ stone in weight I wouldn't recommend it.

Why would a builder charge a 4 figure sum? I charge 120 to do loft boarding and it takes a day of effort. If the builder is charging a lot more then you might have "mug" tattooed on your forehead. Add the cost of the boards and it works out to around 200 all in.
PoP
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You don't work in Somerset do you ?? I'd happily pay someone else that kind of money to do it ....

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I work on the principle of so long as travel is paid for.....
Now let's see. Somerset. I reckon it's about 3 days there and the same back again, making 7 days in all (I am allowing for popping home for lunch and tea breaks). Are you still interested? ;)
PoP
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My advice: don't do it ... unless you're proposing to convert the loft into living space (which involves a *little* more than putting down boards!) you'll end up with "useful" storage space which will rapidly fill up with all sorts of crap that really should go straight to the latest landfill ...
:-)
Julian
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On Tue, 17 Feb 2004 17:24:12 +0000, Julian Fowler

That is actually quite good advice. However it can be useful to keep hold of those suitcases and similar items (ski equipment and so on?) which you use very seasonally, then not for the rest of the year. No point having that stuff hanging around the main living space IMHO.
PoP
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wrote:

Depends whose junk it is. I haven't boarded ours and it's still full of junk: mistake was putting in a loft ladder. SWMBO didn't like hoisting herself up off the top of the step ladder into the attic. :-/
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Richard wrote in message

If you're very lucky. I never have been.

Plenty strong enough.

No need to fix them at all if you go right to the the edges of the loft. If the long edge of each t&g panel rests on a joist, the whole thing can't move. If you're not doing the whole loft, you only need to lightly fix the outer boards. IME you usually end up laying the panels *across* the joists and wasting quite a bit because your joist centres are all over the place and, even if the first couple are ok, you find the long edge getting closer and closer to the edge of a joist. As you can't cut the chip lengthways without losing the tongue, crosscutting is a better bet. Get youself a cheap circular saw and make up a T square as a guide. It's a back breaking job, but not difficult.
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Richard wrote on Tuesday (17/02/2004) :

Generally true, but you should try to ensure that board end joints of both boards meet over the joists.

You might crack the ceiling below if you did. It is unlikely you would go through, but none the less you should not bounce about too much.

Four figures will be for a loft conversion, not a simple job of boarding out the loft. You do just intend it for an extra bit of storage for light weight items don't you?
Better and stronger to screw the boards down, they will then be easier to lift later to get access to cables etc.. Check the location of cables and pipes before attempting to fix the boards.
Lay the boards such that two adjacent runs of boards have the joints offset, a little like the bricks in a wall are offset. A good way to start, will be to install a proper light(s) first, you will need one later anyway.
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Harry Bloomfield wrote:

we have a partially boarded out loft, all the central to shoulder height area and i am thinkg of converting it bit by bit into an extra room, not for heavy usage, but maybe a spare bedroom, could i just extend the boarding, make walls et ? or do i need to have a differnt floor, or how should i go about it ? sammi
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I wouldn't go for this myself - there's quite a bit of dust with glass fibre or rockwool floating around in a loft and that could be an irritant.
Plus lofts are usually not closed to the elements - there has to be some airflow to keep things shipshape, and there's insulation between the loft and living areas which will prevent it acclimatising to the same temperature as the rest of the house. In the winter it will get rather cold, in the summer rather hot.
Do you not like your visitors? ;)
PoP
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PoP wrote:

we do not have room for visitors ! :) we have purchased an ex-coucil 3 bed semi with a lot of garden and cul-de-sac but it needs a lot of work. we need to change the central heating from a back boiler to wall mounted in the kitchen system as then we get more room in the living room and 1 bedroom. we have a problem with damp i think as all the walls on the bottom floor seem to be getting wet from underneath; the plaster is 'blooming' dry and crumbling. we need to replace all the upstairs windows, some more urgently than others too and we don't know whether we should extend or how or whether we'd be better off with a loft conversion and a garage and good shed. but we definately need more room. we both work from home, my husband in computers and i as an artist. so i think maybe our 'best' option is to build a good double sized garge next to the house and use that as a combined office/atelier, as we could glaze the back wall too. but it does get difficult then for perhaps we would be better off doing a double floor extension but then it's only a council house so you do not want to spend more than the area is worth ( not that we could actuallly afford that, mind). and so decisions, decisions :)
sammi
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The double garage sounds like a worthwhile idea.
PoP
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