1988 Central Heating

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I understand that if I have my boiler replaced I will have to have thermostatic radiator valves fitted in the bedrooms.
My house was plumbed using the Yorkshire Twin Entry valves on the radiators (Flow and return at one end) just before they went out of favour.
What do you thing will be the best solution if I need to fit thermostatic valves?
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Regards
John
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On Sat, 25 Oct 2003 11:59:19 +0100, "John"

I had a situation where two pipes arrived at a radiator at one end, although not with this type of valve.
I ran one into the TRV and the other up slightly and behind the radiator near the bottom level with the tappings. The lockshield at the other end was fitted horizontally. Since lockshields are quite small, this gives a neat solution.
.andy
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John
As I understand it, it's only a recommendation no one can force you to do it.
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Skip wrote:

I belive it applies to new builds and refurbishments. Does a new boiler count as a refurbishment? I assumed not, but fitted TRVs afterwards as new boiler was so much more effiecient. You don't have to fit them on any room with a thermostat.
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BillR wrote:

AIUI this is how it shapes up.
1) By the book any new boiler has to meet building regs approval either by building control inspecting the installation or by someone who is permitted to self-certify the installation.
2) The enforcement of the above is next to nil. The only way a failure to comply would come to light is a) You sell the house to someone who has a zealous solicitor who is keen to get everything with certificates. b) Your purchasers have a very thorough surveyor. c) Other work happens in the near future which causes building control to inspect the heating (I'm not sure what powers they have over existing non-compliant work).
However why would you want to do something that is less than best practice? If you hate the idea of having bedrooms and other less frequently used spaces cooler, why not fit the TRVs and then leave them full on?
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