Shear pin problem...?

Howdy,
I have a Kubota 2710 tractor with a 6' front mounted snow blower.
We are in the middle of quite a storm and I just went out to plow a bit.
Eventually, I picked up a rock or stick and broke the shear pin on the impeller.
When I bought the blower (about two years ago) I asked for a dozen of the necessary shear pins. Of course, I have just discovered that the impeller pins (that I just broke) are not the same as the augur pins (that the dealer provided.)
So, what might be a good substitute for the hour or so that I need to plow in the morning...? I have a pretty well outfitted shop and a fair amount of miscellaneous hardware crap.
Thanks for any tips,
--
Kenneth

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Is not the shear pin not just a bolt? Stick a same diameter bolt in, at least for now. Probably $0.20.
Next week pick up the factory shear pin. (Probably just a bolt but $3.00.)
Glenn

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Hi Glenn,
In a word, "no" the shear pin is not just a bolt. They look like bolts but have two grooves cut in them in such positions, and at such a depth, that they snap apart before any damage is done to the machine.
The smaller bold approach might work, but I would not know how to estimate the size I would need to avoid the damage against which the proper pin is protecting me.
Thanks for your thoughts,
--
Kenneth

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(Grin) Tell me after you scoop snow for the first hour if you don't get a bolt, any bolt, to finish the job?
Glenn

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Hi again,
I can tell you that now...
We have about 1500 linear feet (about 12' wide) to plow, and there is a fair amount of debris beneath the snow.
As it is the first snow of the year, it is reasonably likely that I will hit something that is capable of breaking the pin. I would not risk the significant damage to the machine unless we were in a real emergency.
The solution I have hit upon (I will experiment in the morning) is to use cable ties. They are plastic, but have a rather high tensile strength. I also know that I can fit several into the hole and because of the configuration (it is two plates joined by the shear pin) I can keep adding them.
I thought that I might just use one or two. If they broke on starting the impeller, I would increase the number. Eventually, I should be at the point just past what is needed to make the thing run. Then, if the system is stressed, I would feel confident that they would break.
All the best,
--
Kenneth

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Personally I would try using solid copper as what is used for grounding wire for houses. They come in different thicknesses and will give you a better strength option and will break if need be.
Patrick
wrote:

a
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Not to mention, an oak dowel driven into the hole.
Glenn
PS, the shovel will work some of the fat off and make lunch taste better. ;)
wrote:

get
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BTDT!
Well, actually maple....

better
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You can probably get by with gr 3 bolts or softer. I use the 1/4" carriage type with the threads all the way. the weaken the shaft nearly like the shear pins. Most hardware at least the rural ones carry a selection of shear pins.
BTW, I have a yard tractor with a 5' blower and I have twisted the impeller shaft using the non-threaded type bolts that were too hard. So make sure you get the soft ones look at the heads to make sure someone didn't throw a grade 6 or 8 in with the soft one.
Later, Byrd

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On Sun, 7 Dec 2003 14:46:08 -0800, "Anon Ymous"

Howdy,
That is exactly what I ended up with. I found a bunch of Grade 2s. It is interesting. I have had the blower for three winters and never broke an impeller shear pin. With this storm, I have gone through three.
I suspect that it is because the ground it still very soft. I am scooping up all sorts of stuff that does not belong in the blower.
All the best,
--
Kenneth

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You can probably get by with gr 3 bolts or softer. I use the 1/4" carriage type with the threads all the way. the weaken the shaft nearly like the shear pins. Most hardware at least the rural ones carry a selection of shear pins.
BTW, I have a yard tractor with a 5' blower and I have twisted the impeller shaft using the non-threaded type bolts that were too hard. So make sure you get the soft ones look at the heads to make sure someone didn't throw a grade 6 or 8 in with the soft one.
............................................................................ ............................................................................ Grade 5 is equal to the metric 8.8 Grade 8 is equal to the metric 10.2
just buy a fencing bolt and shove it in just as long as its atight fit you should of listened to Glenn. You'd never make an aussie farmer/ then we don't get that much snow.
Pommie Les
.
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