Best way to remove studs attached to stucco?

I need to replace some of the 2x4 studs in an exterior load-bearing wall in my garage. Drywood termites have invaded and chomped the insides of several of the studs. (I think the studs are redwood) Even though I had a termite control company treat the studs with Cy-Kick, the studs look pretty bad from over 40 years of various holes and termite treatments.
The challenge will be to remove the old studs one at a time. In running a putty knife behind the studs, it appears that nails were used to secure the wire mesh, which is a backing for the stucco. How can I cut through these nails without damaging the stucco? At best I might be able to get a hacksaw blade behind each stud, but it's going to be slow-going. If I cut the nails, will I somehow weaken the stucco wall?
Also, does anybody know of a source in the SF Bay Area for pressure treated DRY lumber for interior applications? All I see are soaking wet pressure treated stuff for outside use. It's so depressing:-(
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Is there any reason you can't just leave them there and add good studs between? If you want to make sure they are holding the outside wall you could use "liquid nails" to mount it to the sheathing/mesh (whatever is exposed to the inside of the wall.
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The suggestions to sister the new studs are fine.
But if you want to remove the suds use a Sawzall or equal with a 6"+ blade & just cut thru the nails. The blades are very flexible.
Most PT timber available for purchase is wet; sometimes the stuff sits around at Home Depot long enough to dry out. If you don't have a moisture meter, the light ones are usually dry.
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- Bob K 207 -

- Nehmo - Agreed. Removing those old studs is unnecessary and would be a mess.
- Bob K 207 -

- Nehmo - Using a reciprocating saw with a long blade restricted to a bent position is equivalent to rapidly bending and unbending the blade. It will fatigue and break, maybe with the broken off part flying toward the operator's face. Thus, the operator's blood may shoot all over the nice clean job - (not to mention the expense of the blade).
- Bob K 207 -

- Nehmo - Since, the job is in a garage, what's wrong with wet ACQ? But if OP wants dry, use cedar or redwood. If OP wants to absolutely avoid termites, he should use metal. It sounds like only a few studs are involved.
--
*********************
* Nehmo Sergheyev *
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Not to be too disagreeable but.....
this process can be done safely with a VSR recip saw & a metal cutting blade; just don't go nuts with the speed.
If the studs are 16" o/c there is enough room to minimize the angle. I've done this on 100's of studs "with the broken off part flying toward the operator's face" NOT happening.
The bi-metal Milwaukee's will do the job; and they are less than $2 per blade
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- Nehmo -

- Bob K 207-

- Nehmo - You have to make up your mind, do you want to disagree or agree? But whatever you do, you shouldn't walk backwards when you do it.
- Bob K 207-

- Nehmo - That's possible. Sometimes the blade parts fly up and only hit the helper in the face.
- Bob K 207-

- Nehmo - You're neglecting to consider the cost of the cleanup materials needed for the blood and eyeball juice. Easily this can run into another eight bucks. Depending on the wages given to the helper, these additional expenses could put the whole job into the hole!
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* Nehmo Sergheyev *
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You're neglecting to consider the cost of the cleanup materials needed for the blood and eyeball juice
Nope.
He's right, cutting the nails with a metal blade is the easy way.
To the original poster, best of luck, and let us know how it comes out!
--
Lyle B. Harwood, President
Phoenix Homes, Inc.
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