air compressor power supply

I have a Sears 2 hp 12 gallon air compressor approximately 20 years old. It is setup for 110 service. I have an unused 220 line. Is there a safe way to convert the unit to use 220? Mike
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Mboy wrote:

Is it a dual-voltage motor? If not, the only choice is to buy one for it. If the motor is that old, unless you buy really cheap Chinese junk, it will almost certainly be more efficient, but unless you're using that sucker continously (which is probably more than the compressor's duty rating), you're likely to be unable to see the benefit on your bill.
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Yes! Is the short answer, however, it will only operate on a single cylinder, or half of it's designed performance rating. It will not operate by simply plugging it in obviously. If you e-mail me directly I will provide wirinng directions for 110 v operation. My suggestion however would be to run a 220 v drop to the machine, to access all of it's performance value, which, if you email me directly I will also walk you through. It's like wiring a dryer for 110 v it will work but the consumption of power coupled with it's performance value is lacking. There are also inversion devices available that facilitate operation of 220 v devices on a 110v circuit but they are often cost prohibitve, I need additional information to further address your question. Feel free to email me directly.

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I think you misread the question, Tony. He's <got> a 110V motor and wants to know if it can be run on 220V. If it's not a dual voltage motor, the answer is "no"...if it is, it'll almost certainly have a wiring diagram on the motor lead cover...
Tony Berlin wrote:

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Duane's got it right. The motor is currently wired for 110, would like to convert to 220. There is a wiring diagram on the motor lid which does reference 220 vs 110 wiring so it sounds like it may be dual voltage. I wasn't sure whether if I re-wired according I would be safe? Would also need to change the cord as well to configure for 220 outlet? If this sounds do-able to you guys, I'll dig a little deeper, IE, remove the lid and inspect the wiring and report back if I am unsure of what I am doing. Thanks for the info. got my fingers crossed. Mike

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Mboy wrote:

If it shows how to reconnect the leads for 220V, then it has dual-voltage windings and will be perfectly content there just as at 110V. You will, of course, need to change to a plug that matches whichever outlet style you have for the 220V. It should be nothing more than reconnecting a couple of leads...
That said, I'll note I have a wood chip/dust collection unit that I converted from the factory default 110 to 220V via the diagram and all is well. For reasons too long to go into, I wanted to run it on 110V for a while. Unfortunately, it <is> one of the cheap Chinese knockoffs, and the diagram is so unclear I couldn't decide how it actually was intended to be for 110V operation from it and I didn't recall how it was from when I changed it before... :) Being impatient, I just went on without it for the intended (short term) purpose... :(
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Thanks for your help Duane...I'm gonna give it a go. Mike

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