Stainless Repair Clamps


So yesterday the friggin low-bid excavation contrator where I work decided to smash one of our pump station force mains. We had to cut out a section of pipe and install a new piece with stainless repair clamps. It was 6" ID cast iron if that makes a difference.
The plumbing inspector, while not saying it was against code, was basically telling us that the repair clamps have a rated life-expectancy, and he was against approving this repair to be buried again.
We pulled the cut-sheets from the clamps, and called the manufacturer today, and they have no life-expectancy rating. They will last "for life" according to them.
We then forwarded the cut-sheets and an email from the manufacturer stating such. He still refuses to approve them for permanent use.
Has anyone here ever heard of one of these clamps failing when installed right? Can anyone point me to another reference that might have a life- expectancy, or specifically states there is none?
I don't have the cut-sheet in front of me, but the clamps were made by Mueller. They have rubber against the pipe, then stainless steel sheathing with 4 7/8" stainless bolts to clamp.
Thanks.
Oh, and if I can't find anything else, can someone suggest a way to fight the inspector on this? I really don't want to fight him if he is right, but I can't seem to prove that just yet.
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While I think your inspector is being a dick, there are some contextual precedents for this particular circumstance. The problem at it's core is whether your local code perceives a force main as a DWV system, or a high pressure system. There was a time here locally that all force mains or pump induced systems were under the codes as pressure systems. IOW, only pressure rated fittings could be used. About 10 or 15 years ago there was a flip-flop of John Kerry proportions. Everything then switched to gravity codes per UPC. We had to use appropriate long or short DWV fittings, including cleanouts every 135 degrees of turn. The point here is that if your code mandates that force main connections are ruled by DWV codes, you are fine assuming the "no-hub" type bands you used are acceptable under your code and it's amendments. However, if your code states that force mains are governed by the pressure portions of your code, you have a problem. The easiest fix under the circumstances would be to buy two 6" short M.J. couplings and four M.J. transition gland packs. You shouldn't need any rods or thrust blocks since it's a break in a straight line. If this needs farther explanation let me know.
Bob Wheatley
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Thanks, Bob. No further explanation required. I wasn't personally able to speak to the inspector, but since we do conform to the UPC, I will at least have that to stand on. In thinking about it further though, the excavation contractor is liable for this, and has agreed to pay for the repairs that we made, and will pay for any changes required to meet the inspectors approval. So we will probably go the "safer" route and do it right. I am really not all that comfortable with the repair clamps considering that this pipe is/was buried on a big piece of shale with no back-fill.
Anyway, I appreciate the time and the response.
Eric
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We had a Plummer in my city go that way. He put PVC underground, no joints in a church. The city refused to pass it, his lawyer went after our city. He won. Now we all can put proper PVC in DWV underground. ( PVC manufactures helped in the lawsuit $.)
Look the main thing is proper depth, 12" of screening, slope and NO joints.
Ax permission for any joints. He should pass it.

ID
basically
stating
sheathing
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we burry sch35 outside and it is in 12' lengths I think. The connection is a hub with rubber o-rings at the end of each section. you just pound the sections together. When making repairs I will try to dig up enough to bend it just enough to use a coupling with pvc glue to make joint. If cant dig up enough I use pvc slip coupling. The sch 35 is more elastic and can withstand more movement. I don't like to burry the no-hub connectors out of fear with movement they might work loose. I would never burry a fernco under any condition. this is of course just reg gravity fed drains not under force from pumping. The pump mains here I think are butt welded together like the water lines. (not sure have not worked on it just looked at it)
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Sched 40 comes in rolls, too bad no other line sched is offered. I don't know for sure if it is, but it would work out nice if we had that.

6"
installed
life-
fight
right,
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