Removing gas valves


I need to have a gas pipe cut that protrudes from the wall. Besides shutting off and bleeding the gas line, are there any guidelines to follow? (I am hiring a plumber to do this but would like to know more about the process ahead of time.)
Also, after the work is done, should the system be purged with nitrogen to remove the air from the system before turning the gas back on? I'm thinking a spark in a pipe with gas & air might disrupt my sleeping habits.
Sam
PS -- No offense intended, but I can guess as good as anyone else - so I'm hoping someone who has been there done that can offer some info about their past experience.
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Sam,
What should happen is that the plumber simply shuts off the gas, cuts or unscrews the protruding pipe, caps or plugs the pipe in the wall, and then turns the gas back on. Then he'll relight any pilots that need relighting. Any trapped air will be expelled through the pilots. The trapped air will cause no harm. Be suspicious of any extra precautions or steps. It shouldn't be any more complicated than what I've described.
On Dec 12, 5:30 pm, "Sammy bin Snoozin"

off and bleeding the gas line, are there any guidelines to follow? (I am hiring a plumber to do this but would like to know more about the process ahead of time.)

remove the air from the system before turning the gas back on? I'm thinking a spark in a pipe with gas & air might disrupt my sleeping habits.

hoping someone who has been there done that can offer some info about their past experience.
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Thanks, Ironmike. The original pipe was installed in 1960. Easiest thing would be to unscrew the elbow behind the drywall. Do you know any tricks to break loose a threaded joint that old? It looks clean - no corrosion on the outside anyway.
Sam

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Sam,
The easiest thing to do is just screw a plug into the elbow. You could get it tight enough with a little ingenuity. If the elbow is too close to the drywall, then try tightening it a quarter turn and then screw in a plug. If that isn't possible, then use two pipe wrenches and unscrew the elbow and put on a cap. It just takes a little muscle.
On Dec 13, 10:07 pm, "Sammy bin Snoozin"

would be to unscrew the elbow behind the drywall. Do you know any tricks to break loose a threaded joint that old? It looks clean - no corrosion on the outside anyway.

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On Dec 13, 3:07 pm, "Sammy bin Snoozin"

would be to unscrew the elbow behind the drywall. Do you know any tricks to break loose a threaded joint that old? It looks clean - no corrosion on the outside anyway.

shutting off and bleeding the gas line, are there any guidelines to follow? (I am hiring a plumber to do this but would like to know more about the process ahead of time.)

remove the air from the system before turning the gas back on? I'm thinking a spark in a pipe with gas & air might disrupt my sleeping habits.

hoping someone who has been there done that can offer some info about their past experience.
Yours is really new compared to the kind of things I usually deal with. I often take apart gas pipe that is 75 years old. Quality wrenches, pretty good size - no problem!
JK
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Many thanks, JK! I'm probably way overly cautios about gas pipes.
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