No cold water.

In the same are two kitchen sinks. Sink number one works great. A couple feet away (in this little church) is sink number two. It has no cold water but hot water works and occasional it will cough and sneeze hot water (from trapped air pockets.) If you're nearby you will be splashed unexpectedly. This sink has a cold/hot valve under the sink. They're open all the way. The water comes from a well and isn't salt treated. Valves get stuck often. It's so stuck that in order to shutoff water, we'd simply cut power to the well pump. How do I unclog the kitchen sink cold water line?
Thanks
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Leroy,
You need to find the clog. Turn off the well pump or shut off the main valve, disassemble the sink faucet, put a heavy bath towel over the faucet body, and turn on the water for 10 seconds. Continue in this fashion until you locate the clogged valve then clean and rebuild. You should be able to find or map the clog in this way so that you can clean or repair clogged valves or find and replace clogged pipes. from your description, it's the sink faucet.
Good luck, Dave M.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I would not be surprised if one of the valves (under the sink or on the sink) are defective and not really opening when you turn the control. Try disassembling them and see what happens. Be sure to turn off the main and release the pressure first.
Joe Meehan
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Three possibilities: faucet, shutoff valve, pipes.
If the faucet and its valves are old, this is a possibility.
The little disc valves that are commonly used for sink shutoffs have an annoying tendency to clog, jam, and break in hard water. I always replace these with ball valves just on general principles.
The pipes are the least likely, but if you get no water to the shutoff valve, suspect them anyway.
You will need a partner at hand to control the main shutoff, so you don't have to run for it if you get a valve stuck open.
Then start by closing the shutoff valves, disconnecting the sink supply lines, and opening each shutoff valve briefly to see if you get good flow there. If so, it's the faucet; repair or replace it. If not, replace the shutoffs. Use ball-joint shutoff valves; they'll last many times longer and cost just a couple dollars more.
If replacing the shutoffs doesn't give you free flow, you have a clogged pipe. Unless you're handy with pipe work, it's time to call the plumber.
--

Chris Green

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
i start at the screen in the spout of the faucet. then just use common sense and work your way backwards untill you have good flow of water. unless you have galv. pipes for water they prob fine. like others say, shut-off valve likely point of clog if it is not in the faucet itself..
Ill admit I have wasted time before looking at pipes and valves when the problem was in the spout of the faucet.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.