Mixet tub/shower faucet

I'm trying to remove an old Mixet faucet to install a shower surround. The handle (MRH-MET) seems to be seized on and won't come off and I stripped the philips set screw on the mix lever (MLH-MET), which is virtually impossible to get at.
I'd love to get a plumber to do it but the waiting lists are over a week.
Any ideas?
Phil
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On 7/14/04 "Phil" snipped-for-privacy@pacificnospamcoast.net asks in part:

First off are you sure it is a metal handle (that's what MRH-MET indicates) Most Mixet set trim with plastic handles. Supposing it is metal AND you have the screw removed, I'd suggest you spray some plain white vinegar in the handle screw opening and wait a while for it to penetrate, then spray again. Wait 3 or 4 hours and try removing the handle again. There are handle pullers made (kind of looks like a gear puller) to aid in removing handles. They don't always work but most of the time they do.

Once again are you sure it is a metal handle? Mixet makes chromed plastic and chromed metal handles. In either case, with the volume control handle removed you can cut the temperature control handle off the valve. A new Mixet trim set is fairly cheap.
Doug
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Thanks John and Doug for the help. The parts are metal (I don't think plastic was invented when this unit was installed). I rented a puller from the local store and finally got the handle off. The guy at the store recommended a 'grabit' bit to remove the damaged set screw which although awkward to access, did the trick. I had previously taped a bag of vinegar over the works to loosen thing up.
Thanks again.
Phil
asks in part:

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On Wed, 14 Jul 2004 09:27:10 -0700, "Phil"

I usually tackle such things with judicious application of a blowtorch flame, the rationale is that the lever heats up before the shaft it's mounted on, and the differential expansion can loosen the crud that is sealing them together. Often there is some chemical interaction between the lever (some crappy cast metal) and the shaft (often brass), which binds them together. I try this only if all components close to the action are metal. If you don't have a blowtorch handy, try pouring boiling water over the lever where it surrounds the shaft.
--
John W Hall < snipped-for-privacy@telus.net>
Cochrane, Alberta, Canada.
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